read

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Synonyms for read

scan

Synonyms

understand

study

Synonyms

perusal

Synonyms

read something into something

Synonyms

read up on something

Synonyms

Synonyms for read

to understand in a particular way

to give a precise indication of, as on a register or scale

Synonyms for read

something that is read

Related Words

have or contain a certain wording or form

Synonyms

Related Words

look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed

obtain data from magnetic tapes

Synonyms

interpret the significance of, as of palms, tea leaves, intestines, the sky

interpret something in a certain way

be a student of a certain subject

indicate a certain reading

audition for a stage role by reading parts of a role

to hear and understand

Related Words

make sense of a language

References in periodicals archive ?
Reading between the lines, deciphering intertexts, and breaking encryptions expose esoteric substrata to The Blacker the Berry and Infants of the Spring.
Reading between the lines, the underlying meaning of modernization in this work is Americanization: "I have seen the future and it is American.
Insofar as Dowling sees Milton writing "between the lines" for learned readers, he might have engaged (even briefly) with Annabel Patterson's recent consideration of reading between the lines as a political strategy in her historically-oriented book, Reading Between the Lines (1993), which contains several substantial chapters on Milton.
A lot of reading between the lines will be required to understand things.
It's not that I avoid definitive quotes, but probably the reason I choose to "quote" in the way I do is because I'm reading between the lines and working against the context the writer originally intended for the quotes to have in the text.
Reading between the lines of the snide and skeptical environmental reporting of The Washington Post and The New York Times over the last year, one senses ambitious reporters hoping to make a name for themselves, and cynical editors crawling onto the latest rhetorical bandwagon to differentiate themselves from the pack, all at the expense of truth and accurate reporting.
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