pyrosis


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Synonyms for pyrosis

a painful burning sensation in the chest caused by gastroesophageal reflux (backflow from the stomach irritating the esophagus)

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References in periodicals archive ?
The symptoms included severe pyrosis, regurgitation, and nausea, which subsided a little during the following hours but worsened in relation to any meals and ingestions of any type of liquid.
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a relatively common condition, in which stomach acids are refluxed up through the esophagus and oral cavity, causing heartburn in stomach and dental erosion in the mouth.1,2,3 The condition is defined as the involuntary passage of gastric contents into the esophagus.4 Symptoms of GERD include pyrosis, heartburn, chest pain, hoarseness, asthma, recurrent pneumonia, chronic cough, otitis media, reflux laryngitis, and sore throat.5,6
pain epigastrium, nausea, vomiting pyrosis, hematemesis, melena, postprandial abdominal fullness, early satiety, belching, recurrent diarrhoea, alternating diarrhoea and constipation was recorded.
Amidst the few adverse effects reported regarding glucosamine supplements [20], the most common are gastrointestinal complaints, including pain, diarrhea, nausea, and pyrosis [82].
have shown that when the distal myotomy in the stomach is increased to 3 cm, both dysphagia rates and LES resting pressures are further reduced, with no associated increase in pyrosis, regurgitation, or thoracic pain [12].
Gastroesophageal reflux disease - also called heartburn, pyrosis, or reflux esophagitis - is an uncommon complication in women of reproductive age.
Postoperative symptoms including dysphagia, pyrosis, regurgitation, pain, weight loss, and episodic aspiration presents commonly following esophageal reconstruction.9 Fortunately, these symptoms can be managed through dietary, behavior modification and additional medications for acid suppression or promote gastric emptying.
The incidence of pyrosis markedly increases during pregnancy (Castro, 1967; Marrero et al., 1992).
A 46-year-old man presented to the Center for Voice and Swallowing with symptoms of globus, pyrosis, and solid food dysphagia.
Symptoms may include pyrosis, dyspepsia, regurgitation, dysphagia, hypersalivation, and esophagitis.