punch-drunk


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Related to punch-drunk: Punch drunk syndrome
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Synonyms for punch-drunk

Synonyms for punch-drunk

dazed from or as if from repeated blows

References in periodicals archive ?
I'm still " punch-drunk from hearing their insanely stupid soundbites "
Punch-Drunk Love, "winner of the best director prize at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival" (Stanton, 2003), "is a romantic comedy as wonderful as it is strange that expands the genre to its absurdist limits" (Turan, 2002, p.
The first reaction of a punch-drunk public to the news that yet another site is under consideration for Birmingham's new library will probably be one of incredulity.
2 THE GIRLS GUITAR CLUB Mary Lynn Rajskub (Punch-Drunk Love, the TV show 24) and Karen Kilgariff (Mr.
Professor Tracy's latest work is by no means easy reading, for it attempts to put together a vast amount of information from all over Europe and in so doing leaves the reader somewhat punch-drunk from the immense quantity of names and data and the extensive footnotes in five or six languages.
This punch-drunk and eloquent comment on the current political troubles of our planet achieved what was only hinted at elsewhere, yet remained acutely personal.
The would-be pop-hits are also present and correct - Rock Hard Blues is as catchy as lo-fi punch-drunk indie can get.
Although I'm mad for Paul Thomas Anderson's new picture, Punch-Drunk Love, I also suspect it's made me a little crazy.
Jan Maxwell lends credence to each character, sounding in turn like an old lady, a seven-year-old child, a punch-drunk handyman, and more.
WORD has reached me that Audley Harrison has been scouring the working men's clubs of Britain to find another punch-drunk bum after the British Boxing Board of Control intervened over his fight with Bristol publican Greg Wedlake.
Like a punch-drunk fighter, America's audit industry is struggling to its feet amidst a barrage of criticism.
When the overwhelming nature of the Republican victory in the November midterm elections became clear, the nation's most prominent Democratic elected officials seemed to be punch-drunk. President Clinton and his White House minions struggled with little success to come up with a satisfactory explanation, as did most of their Congressional cohorts.
PBS, a few weeks earlier, had aired Adam Smith's lament for the over-regulat ed drug industry which Smith sympathetically describes as "punch-drunk" before intoning: "Pharmaceuticals - this is a high-tech, high-wage industry.