profanation


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Synonyms for profanation

an act of disrespect or impiety toward something regarded as sacred

Synonyms for profanation

blasphemous behavior

degradation of something worthy of respect

References in periodicals archive ?
Cued by Mlle Vinteuil's dare, the friend spits upon the photograph, extending the profanation of the parent from the realm of words to the realm of deeds, a gesture that succinctly and effectively physicalizes the sadistic impulse.
It may include feelings of guilt or profanation, at times engendering a twinge--or surge--of regret, an impulse to repent.
(Foucault once called our interest in transgression "a profanation without object"; the twentieth century, he suggested, was defined by a love of transgression regardless of what was transgressed.) To think about this context for Meyer's material is to see how queer artists, far from being on the margin, might sum up some of the defining preoccupations of the century.
But Sturge had plenty more bees in his bonnet than this one and chief among them was what he called 'the profanation of God's word for the purposes of entertainment'.
For example, in describing the traditional practice of carrying the casket out of the funeral parlor, he contrasts it with the movement of the casket by secular Jews: "The shifting of the task to the employees of a funeral chapel and use of a little wagon typify the increasing secularization, depersonalization, and profanation that characterize the contemporary American funeral and Jewish life" (p.
Unification Church officials said that the ruling was ''based on prejudice'' and was ''unjust'' and that it was tantamount to ''profanation'' of those who have faith in the church's teachings.
Nevertheless, I was interested to see that, out of 1200 respondents (presumably folks connected to the advertising business), 72% characterized the Alcatel ad as "a disgraceful profanation" compared to the 28% who characterized the ad as "a stirring homage." (These unscientific surveys aren't known for their bland language.) Everyone will apply their own sense of right and wrong, of course.
From these theological distortions emerged false charges of Jewish ritual murders and profanation of the Eucharist.
The Archbishop orders the mayor to halt the performance in 1572 because he has been told that the plays contain "sundry absurd & gross errours & heresies joyned with profanation & great abuse of god's holy word" but he then adds that the inhibition is to hold until "your said plays shall be perused corrected & reformed by such learned men as by us shall be there unto appointed & the same so reformed by us allowed" (147).
With her 1998 revision, Garton updated her devastating critiques of these pro-abortion "arguments," and took the occasion to dismantle some of the catchier reformulations such as the thrice-sacrilegious profanation that "Abortion is between a woman, her doctor, and her God."
The Book of Sports, reissued in 1633, seemed to sanction local disorder as well as profanation of the Sabbath.
The successful promotion of frequent confession is what prompted the heightened concern for the profanation of the sacrament by sexual overtures on the part of the confessor.
He was also charged with profanation of the Eleusinian mysteries and mutilation of the Hermae.
It is clear that some profanation of the sabbath did reflect theological sympathies: one man summoned for unspecified sabbath breaking was eventually proved to have said to the minister who rebuked him: 'faith I will sie ye day quhen we sail lay ye qwhytt surples on [??]our bakis with longe stavis'--evidently he wasn't a Presbyterian!