printing

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Synonyms for printing

the act or process of publishing printed matter

the entire number of copies of a publication printed from a single typesetting

Synonyms

Synonyms for printing

References in classic literature ?
The invention of printing is the greatest event in history.
Behold how, beginning with the discovery of printing, architecture withers away little by little, becomes lifeless and bare.
Before the invention of printing, reform would have been merely a schism; printing converted it into a revolution.
In proportion as architecture ebbs, printing swells and grows.
We may still have from time to time, under the reign of printing, a column made I suppose, by a whole army from melted cannon, as we had under the reign of architecture, Iliads and Romanceros, Mahabâhrata, and Nibelungen Lieds, made by a whole people, with rhapsodies piled up and melted together.
This book, written by architecture, must be admired and perused incessantly; but the grandeur of the edifice which printing erects in its turn must not be denied.
Nevertheless, when one tries to collect in one's mind a comprehensive image of the total products of printing down to our own days, does not that total appear to us like an immense construction, resting upon the entire world, at which humanity toils without relaxation, and whose monstrous crest is lost in the profound mists of the future?
It is not quite known who first discovered the art of printing, but William Caxton was the first man who set up a printing-press in England.
I do not mean that you could read it as it was first printed, for the oldest kind of printing was not unlike the writing used in manuscripts and so seems hard to read now.
For since printing came our language has changed very much less than it did before.
Jupenet, "this little piece of metal is a printing letter.
So," resumed the poet, returning to his dominant ideas, "you never saw any printing done?
Francesco de Furia, a learned Italian, contributed further testimony to the correctness of the supposition that Babrias had made a veritable collection of fables by printing from a MS.
But tell me, are you printing this book at your own risk, or have you sold the copyright to some bookseller?
I have heard of this book already," said Don Quixote, "and verily and on my conscience I thought it had been by this time burned to ashes as a meddlesome intruder; but its Martinmas will come to it as it does to every pig; for fictions have the more merit and charm about them the more nearly they approach the truth or what looks like it; and true stories, the truer they are the better they are;" and so saying he walked out of the printing office with a certain amount of displeasure in his looks.