primitive


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Synonyms for primitive

Synonyms for primitive

not derived from something else

of or being an irreducible element

of, existing, or occurring in a distant period

exhibiting lack of education or knowledge

lacking expert, careful craftsmanship

of or relating to early stages in the evolution of human culture

Synonyms

Synonyms for primitive

a mathematical expression from which another expression is derived

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a word serving as the basis for inflected or derived forms

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belonging to an early stage of technical development

Synonyms

Related Words

little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral type

Synonyms

Related Words

used of preliterate or tribal or nonindustrial societies

of or created by one without formal training

References in classic literature ?
Quickly he learned their simple speech, their native customs, and the ethics of their wild, primitive tribal life.
It is no child's play to hunt wild elephants with the crude weapons of primitive man.
It relates, with the usual terse and unadorned power of really primitive poetry, how the hero Beowulf, coming over the sea to the relief of King Hrothgar, delivers him from a monster, Grendel, and then from the vengeance of Grendel's only less formidable mother.
The general characteristics of all theocratic architecture are immutability, horror of progress, the preservation of traditional lines, the consecration of the primitive types, the constant bending of all the forms of men and of nature to the incomprehensible caprices of the symbol.
The primitive non-cognitive element in desire seems to be a push, not a pull, an impulsion away from the actual, rather than an attraction towards the ideal.
The beast primitive in him was loose and roaring--the beast primitive of the holes and caves of the long ago.
We were in a fair way to succeed when there ap-peared, pouring from among the trees beyond the beach, a horde of yelling, painted savages, brandishing all sorts of devilish-looking primitive weapons.
He and the lions had been making so much noise that neither could hear anything above their concerted bedlam, and so it was that Tarzan did not hear the great bulk bearing down upon him from behind until an instant before it was upon him, and then he turned to see Buto, the rhinoceros, his little, pig eyes blazing, charging madly toward him and already so close that escape seemed impossible; yet so perfectly were mind and muscles coordinated in this unspoiled, primitive man that almost simultaneously with the sense perception of the threatened danger he wheeled and hurled his spear at Buto's chest.
Now by the abolition of serfdom we have been deprived of our authority; and so our husbandry, where it had been raised to a high level, is bound to sink to the most savage primitive condition.
Though the long period of a Southern whaling voyage (by far the longest of all voyages now or ever made by man), the peculiar perils of it, and the community of interest prevailing among a company, all of whom, high or low, depend for their profits, not upon fixed wages, but upon their common luck, together with their common vigilance, intrepidity, and hard work; though all these things do in some cases tend to beget a less rigorous discipline than in merchantmen generally; yet, never mind how much like an old Mesopotamian family these whalemen may, in some primitive instances, live together; for all that, the punctilious externals, at least, of the quarter-deck are seldom materially relaxed, and in no instance done away.
By the book reviewers and the namby- pambys I am esteemed a sort of primitive beast that delights in the spilled blood of violence and horror.
Courage, however, and adventure, and delight in the uncertain, in the unattempted--COURAGE seemeth to me the entire primitive history of man.
It's the Solomon Islands, and a pretty primitive proposition for all that.
He was hairy and unkempt, and as he finally stepped into view I saw that he was garbed in the same primitive fashion.
Who ever saw his old clothes -- his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy, by him perchance to be bestowed on some poorer still, or shall we say richer, who could do with less?