pinprick

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  • noun

Words related to pinprick

a minor annoyance

small puncture (as if made by a pin)

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References in periodicals archive ?
The world is a different place when seen from this kind of vantage point: we are less than pinpricks in the universe but the blessings bestowed upon us and those we have created are laid out in a divine panorama.
The bearded man on the 14-foot cloth has long hair, nail wounds on his wrists and feet, pinpricks from thorns on his forehead, and a spear wound to his chest.
"We have to try and put pinpricks in their defence to get a goal," he said, presumably while cooking sausages.
the pedestrians gleamed like pinpricks. Someone somewhere was walking
7 -- India has to take adequate precautions but not give up hope of peaceful resolution of issues with China, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said on Monday, reacting to "pinpricks" by Beijing on Jammu and Kashmir and other issues.
It took us all a while to realise what they were but it was a beautiful sight and strangely moving to watch the golden pinpricks of light in the night sky.
"We could replace the invasive techniques of intravenous blood collection and even tissue biopsies with pinpricks of blood, or fine needle aspirates of tissue," Wheeler said.
Following the pinpricks and taking care not to cut all the way through, use a small carving chisel or linoleum cutter to outline the design.
"When I looked at my arm, there were two pinpricks at the centre of a swelling lump.
When water tanks rust, they get lots of tiny pinpricks that, if combined, can cause the tank to rupture.
In the meantime, I think Christians, at least, can endure the rhetorical pinpricks from this recent spate of skeptical attacks on our faith.
in the deep-purple pinpricks of elderberry, drizzled
There's no stopping the idea of home once it pinpricks a path into your head.
Stars are millions of times farther away, so we see them as tiny pinpricks of light: The beam of light from a star as so thin that pockets of hot and cold air in the atmosphere can bend it, making the star twinkle.
They argue that different existing Directives that in theory should cover the risk of injuries by needle pinpricks have not had the desired effect and requested the Commission to present a proposal for amendment to Directive 2000/54 on the risks linked to being exposed to biological germs at work.