pillory


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Synonyms for pillory

ridicule

Synonyms

Synonyms for pillory

a wooden instrument of punishment on a post with holes for the wrists and neck

expose to ridicule or public scorn

Synonyms

punish by putting in a pillory

criticize harshly or violently

References in periodicals archive ?
Half-way up the street and clamped to the wall outside the former police station stands the town pillory.
Novak explains, "Addressing the pillory as if it were a sentient being, Defoe turned the poem to the subject of the villains in the society who really deserved to be punished.
It hardly helps when gay conservatives pillory organizations that strive for racial parity or chafe at making alliances with other groups and their causes.
But it says even less for an audience that would probably have been first in the queue to throw rotten vegetables at poor souls locked in the pillory.
The authors demonstrate that the pillory underwent a revival after 1750 to punish sexual assault, homosexuality and deceit, while the stocks were still used in Berwick until the mid nineteenth-century.
Let's not pillory Jo Moore for doing her job too well.
Their show usually tries to humiliate public figures, and pillory them.
He then became a radical MP, suffered imprisonment due to a financial scandal and was the last man to stand in the pillory.
This being the case, I am not prepared to pillory affluent young couples who decide to go the on-line ovulation route.
In science's version of an old-fashioned pillory, seven independent teams assailed the hypothesis that thousands of house-size snowballs plow into Earth's atmosphere each day.
did not, in fact, haul miscreants up before congressional committees," he writes, "fire or flunk non-conformists, pillory them in the press or take their passports away.
In the final scene, the minister mounts the pillory with Hester and their child, revealing his guilt and the scarlet letter that remorse had etched on his breast.
The book, compiled by Coleshill Civic Society following sponsorship from the Local Heritage Initiative, focuses on the role of Coleshill as a coaching town, its 22 inns, workhouse, market place and pillory.
Pleading guilty, as technically he was, and appealing for mercy on the ground that he had not meant to be taken seriously, he was sentenced to stand three times in the pillory, pay a stiff fine and remain in prison until he could provide sureties for his good behaviour for seven years.
Coleshill town councillor Barry Gascoigne has spent months restoring the 18ft high pillory and whipping post that is attached to the outside wall of the Old Market Hall.