philanthropist


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Synonyms for philanthropist

Synonyms for philanthropist

someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being

References in classic literature ?
There are men in the world," Wingrave continued, "called philanthropists, amiable, obese creatures as a rule, whose professed aim in life it is to do as much good as possible.
For example," said the Great Philanthropist, watching the teardrops pattering in the dust, "these early rains are of incalculable advantage to the farmer.
The last were not England's best men and women; only, perhaps, her best philanthropists.
So this old philanthropist used to make her equal run of her errands, execute her millinery, and read her to sleep with French novels, every night.
Instructions were then despatched to the Philanthropist for the departure and arrival, in good time for dinner, of Mr.
But when the swift Pequod, with a fresh leading wind, was herself in hot chase; how very kind of these tawny philanthropists to assist in speeding her on to her own chosen pursuit, -- mere riding-whips and rowels to her, that they were.
How much this accident meant to Jurgis he realized only by stages; for he found that the harvester works were the sort of place to which philanthropists and reformers pointed with pride.
1759-1833), English philanthropists and anti-slavery agitators who helped to secure passage of the Emancipation Bill by Parliament in 1833.
To this section belong economists, philanthropists, humanitarians, improvers of the condition of the working class, organisers of charity, members of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, temperance fanatics, hole-and-corner reformers of every imaginable kind.
But when these philanthropists send us such glowing accounts of one half of their labours, why does their modesty restrain them from publishing the other half of the good they have wrought?
Two or three decades ago social philosophers and statisticians and well-meaning philanthropists were still talking and writing about the deportation of the Negroes, or about their settlement within some restricted area, or about their settling in all parts of the Union, or about their decline through their neglect of their children, or about their rapid multiplication till they should expel the whites from the South--of every sort of nonsense under heaven.
And if this is true of the sons, even the daughters, even in the nineteenth century, are apt to become people of importance-- philanthropists and educationalists if they are spinsters, and the wives of distinguished men if they marry.
Sitting on the deck at Helen's feet she went on turning the pages and reading biographies of bankers, writers, clergymen, sailors, surgeons, judges, professors, statesmen, editors, philanthropists, merchants, and actresses; what clubs they belonged to, where they lived, what games they played, and how many acres they owned.
Not that we are philanthropists, but that we need the investors in our big development scheme.
A pretty spectacle, you philanthropists getting the teamsters down and gouging them.