pay for


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Related to pay for: Pay for performance
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Synonyms for pay for

have as a guest

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In a 26 June 2006 New York Times article, "Marketers Say They Pay for Play in News Media," Alex S.
But higher prices would make Wal-Mart's shoppers bear the cost: Wal-Mart's low-income customers would, in effect, be paying a regressive new sales tax to pay for the employees' added health benefits.
I figured, since I bought the goods and used them, the right thing for me to do is pay for them.
Thus, while some employers may be tempted to fund amounts sufficient to pay for catastrophic illnesses in retirement, an actuarial determination of funding for those amounts would consider the likelihood that those costs would actually be incurred.
Welcome to the world of physician pay for performance.
For everyone eligible for Medicare, a complicated new program called Part D will help pay for medicines starting January 1, 2006.
"Additional part-time staff is being considered to minimize the financial impact of having to pay for extended coverage previously provided by exempted employees.
But Broad, who eschews the politically loaded expression "pay for performance," has had a hand in doing what many considered nearly impossible in a major city: the anticipated introduction in Denver of a salary system that rewards teachers not just on longevity but on such factors as whether they work in poor neighborhoods and whether their students meet academic goals.
The employer amends the plan (the Amended Plan) to provide that the employer will continue to pay for this coverage on a pre-tax basis for eligible employees.
I've known ninny teachers who would gladly have sacrificed pay for a sense of accomplishment and respect.
Weekly pay for teachers in 2001 was about the same (within 10 percent) as for accountants, biological and life scientists, registered nurses, and editors and reporters, while teachers earned significantly more than social workers and artists.
Civil service and collective bargaining conventions prevent school systems from getting the teachers they need in three ways: by forbidding extra pay for people with rare skills; by tying pay increments to seniority rather than performance; and by emphasizing training in pedagogy over knowledge of content, even in math and science.
YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR. AT LEAST, that's how things played out after Brazil's free Internet craze.
Most of the violations involved insufficient pay for overtime work and misapplied overtime exemptions.
Albert admitted that she received gas, electricity, heat, hot water and cold water without having to pay for these services.