passionateness


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Synonyms for passionateness

References in periodicals archive ?
Byrne, "The Passionateness of Being: The Legacy of Bernard Lonergan, SJ," in Finding God in All Things: Celebrating Bernard Lonergan, John Courtney Murray, and Karl Rahner, ed.
Though Plato also discusses seriously another passion--thymos--in the end he chooses "object-seeking passionateness," that is, love over self-regarding and serf-affirming pride.
But as he sat still for a moment, and as he steadfastly looked into the mate's malignant eye and perceived the stacks of powder-casks heaped up in him and the slow-match silently burning along towards them; as he instinctively saw all this, that strange forbearance and unwillingness to stir up the deeper passionateness in any already ireful being--a repugnance most felt, when felt at all, by really valiant men even when aggrieved--this nameless phantom feeling, gentlemen, stole over Steelkilt.
63) In another place Lonergan writes of "the passionateness of being" underpinning and accompanying this whole movement.
Rather (Babel) was drawn by what the violence goes along with, the boldness, the passionateness, the simplicity and directness--and the grace.
How many readers of Jude, for instance, have been aware that Arabella first (in Harper's Monthly Magazine) tells her friend Anny that she "must have" Jude "in a curiously low, fierce tone of latent passionateness," and that in subsequent versions "Hardy substantially revised her words and the description of her voice in speaking them, altering 'fierce' to 'hungry', 'passionateness' to 'sensuousness', and 'I want him to marry me' to 'I want him to have me; to marry me.
Of course, such an evaluative "feeling" (which I'll clarify shortly) cannot be all their is to the passionateness of the evaluation, for it must also be such that it moves the subject in the appropriate ways in that it is part of the way in which the emotion can properly explain the behavior and other mental states resulting from the emotion.
See Lonergan, "Natural Right and Historical Mindedness" 174-75, where in addition to the precepts of authentic intentional performance he refers to a dimension that can be called "psychic": "a tidal movement that begins before consciousness, unfolds through sensitivity, intelligence, rational reflection, responsible deliberation, only to find its rest beyond all of these" in love; see also Lonergan, "Mission and the Spirit," in A Third Collection 29-30, where the same dimension is called "the passionateness of being" that "underpins and accompanies and reaches beyond the subject as experientially, intelligently, rationally, morally conscious.