part


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Related to part: part of speech, path
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Synonyms for part

organ

side

Synonyms

part company

Synonyms

in good part

in part

Synonyms

on the part of

Synonyms

  • by
  • in
  • from
  • made by
  • carried out by

take part in

Synonyms

take someone's part

Synonyms

Synonyms for part

one of the parts into which something is divided

one of the individual entities contributing to a whole

a particular subdivision of a written work

one's proper or expected function in a common effort

one of two or more opposing opinions, actions, or attitudes, as in a disagreement

Synonyms

to make a division into parts, sections, or branches

to become or cause to become apart one from another

to terminate a relationship or an association by or as if by leaving one another

relating to or affecting only a part; not total

Synonyms for part

that which concerns a person with regard to a particular role or situation

Related Words

the actions and activities assigned to or required or expected of a person or group

a line of scalp that can be seen when sections of hair are combed in opposite directions

Synonyms

Related Words

the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music

the part played by a person in bringing about a result

in part

References in classic literature ?
Do not be afraid of my wanting the character," cried Julia, with angry quickness: "I am not to be Agatha, and I am sure I will do nothing else; and as to Amelia, it is of all parts in the world the most disgusting to me.
There are two of the most beautiful parts still behind, which this story gives some idea of, and lets us into the parts of them, but they are either of them too long to be brought into the same volume, and indeed are, as I may call them, whole volumes of themselves, viz.
I have conceived the part of Lucy," she observed, with the demurest gravity.
VANSTONE'S inquiries into the proposed theatrical entertainment at Evergreen Lodge were answered by a narrative of dramatic disasters; of which Miss Marrable impersonated the innocent cause, and in which her father and mother played the parts of chief victims.
From the facts alluded to in the first chapter, I think there can be little doubt that use in our domestic animals strengthens and enlarges certain parts, and disuse diminishes them; and that such modifications are inherited.
Several facts, namely, that beetles in many parts of the world are very frequently blown to sea and perish; that the beetles in Madeira, as observed by Mr.
The rat and mouse cannot be considered as domestic animals, but they have been transported by man to many parts of the world, and now have a far wider range than any other rodent, living free under the cold climate of Faroe in the north and of the Falklands in the south, and on many islands in the torrid zones.
Homologous parts, as has been remarked by some authors, tend to cohere; this is often seen in monstrous plants; and nothing is more common than the union of homologous parts in normal structures, as the union of the petals of the corolla into a tube.
Every one knows the difference in the ray and central florets of, for instance, the daisy, and this difference is often accompanied with the abortion of parts of the flower.
There are very few valleys which lead to the central ranges, and the mountains are quite impassable in other parts by beasts of burden.
In the inhabited parts we bought a little firewood, hired pasture for the animals, and bivouacked in the corner of the same field with them.
The valley takes its name of Yeso from a great bed, I should think at least 2000 feet thick, of white, and in some parts quite pure, gypsum.
These alternating masses are covered in the central parts, by a great thickness of red sandstone, conglomerate, and calcareous clay-slate, associated with, and passing into, prodigious beds of gypsum.
Apparently women never acted; men and boys took the women's parts.
Among these traditions were the disregard for unity, partly of action, but especially of time and place; the mingling of comedy with even the intensest scenes of tragedy; the nearly complete lack of stage scenery, with a resultant willingness in the audience to make the largest possible imaginative assumptions; the presence of certain stock figures, such as the clown; and the presentation of women's parts by men and boys.