parody

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Synonyms for parody

Synonyms for parody

a usually amusing caricature of another

a false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something

to copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way

Synonyms for parody

a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way

humorous or satirical mimicry

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make a spoof of or make fun of

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make a parody of

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References in periodicals archive ?
Because there has been little investigation into exactly why scholarship so frequently categorizes "Neue Lebensansichten eines Katers" as a satire, a discussion of its parodistic underpinnings is lacking; yet, the distinction and relationship between parody and satire help uncover how the formal dimensions of Wolf's text affect its satirical intent.
The enduring officiousness and control after the war became wellsprings of Jonke's parodistic bent, as he makes clear.
But vivid, even uncomfortable feelings continue to pull at you, to nag in spectral and parodistic ways.
a stereotypically Scottish dramatis persona in his appearance and language, is immediately typified as a parodistic horror character virtually from his first screen appearance.
13) This detail might recall, on a parodistic note, the "Birth of Venus" by Sandro Botticelli.
Zeitlin continues: since "the allusions are fragmentary and sometimes apparently random, culture itself is seen as open to fragmentation, already fragmented, for words, gestures, and acts can be drawn out of their original contexts for the purpose of play, distortion, and dissonance, for reduction of meaning, for parodistic echo, and, above all, for a kind of treasonous and deliberate misunderstanding.
Relying on the subversive, parodistic counter-reading that he uses throughout the Salons, Diderot stages a mock-drama of his own desire with himself as Jupiter and Therbusch as Antiope.
Weill's foreword to the production book described the "Paradise City" of Mahagonny as a contemporary idyll riven by discontent and the threat of natural disaster, first reconstituted into a parodistic utopia/dystopia of the marketplace, then collapsed under its financial crises.
It is not, however, true that Gotterdammerung as a whole is parodistic (197), let alone that it possesses "unmusicality and conventional insipidness" (Steinberg, quoted with approval on 200).
Evans called the music "predominantly parodistic," pointing out the aspects of popular music in the work, and leaving out the importance of avant garde techniques.
Twentieth-century examples of ironic, parodistic, and self-reflexive uses of CPT abound: for instance, the rescue in extremis of the heroes of Brecht's Threepenny Opera through the Deus Ex Machina arrival of the king's mounted messenger (an irony also present in Brecht's eighteen century intertext, John Gay's The Beggar's Opera) (3); or the discovery by one of the two protagonists of A.
Thirdly, text-image relationships add another dimension to the ironic and parodistic self-reflectiveness of urban representations focusing on the flaneur.
The cities were in a decline more pathetic than menacing, crime was represented in popular culture by the parodistic corporatism of "The Syndicate" (never, in those days, the Mafia), and great, late noirs like The Sweet Smell of Success (1957) were first-run failures.
Despite popular confusion, Bloom claims, Fundamentalism, "the parodistic curse of the American religion," has altogether different aims from this group of sects.
In many of his works--for instance, Grand Pianola Music and Fearful Symmetries (1988)--his music assumes a strident, parodistic tone that, for many critics, tends too far toward the garish and superficial.