ownerless


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  • adj

Synonyms for ownerless

having no owner

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
While Browning, too, writes the passage above--"No less, man, bounded, yearning to be free, / May so project his surplusage of soul / In search of body, so add self to self / By owning what lay ownerless before,"--in mostly regular iambic pentameter, punctuated by an occasional spondee or trochee, his breaks from an almost hypnotic meter wake us at moments in which the poem specifically addresses form.
came (to the world of ownerless things), but that which may only be
It is conceivable that this state of affairs with ownerless public streets can go on forever without leading to any conflict.
Hence if pain is ultimately real, it must be ownerless or impersonal.
A finding of cultural value is an ownerless object pursuant to Art 105 (1) of the LPA and it belongs to the state regardless of on whose immovable it was found.
Subtly, almost dispassionately, Simpson works her habitual magic, showing how love travels, ownerless and unbidden, among children who need adults, and adults who need children.
This country is not ownerless," said another Turkish Citizen.
formerly had an owner, "a movable becomes ownerless if its owner
Finally, Justice Cohn drew support from the general power of a rabbinic court to declare property ownerless and to assign it to another.
Brouillet did not do enough research when he was looking for ownerless land.
9) Second, the value of ownerless works could be dissipated through debasing or inappropriate uses.
Bez feels that the two sides fortunes couldn't be more contrasting as ownerless and managerless United take on a West Brom side hoping to make an instant return to the Premier League under the guidance of Roberto Di Matteo in front of a full house at the Hawthorns.
A Crown Estate spokesman said the precinct's "common areas" such as the walkway passed to The Crown Estate by "escheat" - a common law doctrine that operates to ensure property is not left in limbo and ownerless.
Feral, as used in this article, refers to ownerless dogs and cats that have reverted to the wild state and lack characteristics associated with domestication.