overspecialize

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Synonyms for overspecialize

become overly specialized

References in periodicals archive ?
Given the vast scope of his encyclopedic thought, which harks back to an earlier conception of philosophy that predates academic insularity and overspecialization, Serres's theories are relevant to nearly any discipline.
(182.) This is often ascribed to economic overspecialization, in addition to the corruption that such wealth can incentivize.
disciplinarians maintain that interdisciplinary approaches to analysis and research result in superficiality; interdisciplinary proponents argue that disciplinarity produces naive overspecialization. The vision of the bricolage promoted here recognizes the dialectical nature of this disciplinary and interdisciplinary relationship and calls for a synergistic interaction between the two concepts ...
Noddings's thesis is that we should replace some 20th-century thinking, such as about competition, bureaucracy, overspecialization, and standardization, with habits of cooperation, connection, and critical and creative thinking.
The industrial-scale "bonanza farms" of 100 years ago were killed by overspecialization and loss of ecological integrity through soil exhaustion and disease.
demonstrated examples of obstacles that prevent women from using modern contraceptives, such as inappropriate contraindications, eligibility restrictions, unnecessary process hurdles, overspecialization of providers, bias and unnecessary regulations.
I'm critical of the overspecialization of the academy because I think that tension can swing too far in one direction.
The novel thus presents a cautionary tale of overspecialization: when we cease to inquire into the people and services on which we rely--falling into the habit that Anthony Giddens has called "trust in expert systems" (29)--we sacrifice part of our moral agency.
"In a university," he insisted, "you should live an intellectual life, your interests should go beyond your research specialty." But as Rabi surveyed changes in American universities in the decades after World War II, he confronted an overspecialization that killed catholic and inclusive interests.
Even in the 1940s, the federal Zook Commission contended that "liberal education has been splintered by overspecialization" and suggested that "the failure to provide any core of unity in...higher education is a cause for grave concern." (14) Both the Zook and Rockefeller Commissions recommended that colleges and universities focus on teaching students how to solve human problems before preparing them for the job market.
This overspecialization seems to be at the heart of our industry's lack of genuine innovation.
329, 334-35 (1991) ("In forming the CAFC, Congress sought to avoid overspecialization and capture by creating 'a varied docket spanning a broad range of legal issues.'" (quoting H.R.
Americans yearn for forums where they can engage and interpret the public questions of our time, and where a life of the mind can emerge and grow communally, free of the fetters of overspecialization. Without an engaged public, there can be no true public conversations, and no true public intellectuals.
And secondly, it may lead to overspecialization, thus turning out to be ineffective.