orchestra

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Words related to orchestra

a musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string players

seating on the main floor in a theater

References in periodicals archive ?
Early discussions with producer Kevin Feige and director Shane Black resulted in a plan, Tyler says, "to do something that is classic, along the lines of Superman or Star Wars, a theme that's really singable but is done orchestrally with a lot of brass.
The three protagonists each get a particular musical leitmotif and Puccini threads them orchestrally and vocally throughout the opera to generate an ever-escalating emotional wallop.
The symbols in novellas--religious, Freudian, Jungian, and Marxian--present themselves orchestrally in the form of leitmotifs that dovetail with disparate time sequences to create a strong over-arching moral theme: hence the novella's connection with allegory.
Santos' most famous composition, Nana, is an infectious song that's been recorded over 150 times since the mid-1960s, and represents a starting point for understanding the rhythmically challenging and orchestrally sophisticated body of work the composer created.
Luciano Pavarotti, Italy's greatest living cultural icon, put an exclamation mark on the Turin Olympics' opening ceremony with an orchestrally backed rendition of Puccini's Nessun Dorma on Friday night.
The waltzes of Johann Strauss the Elder gave them the perfect vehicle for that expression but his son took the waltz form to an even greater height by developing the music orchestrally and the people of Vienna fell under their spell.
Between them Graham Tulloch and Christopher Whyte tackle two distinct areas of Robert Garioch's oeuvre: the orchestrally sonorous Scots versions of the Latin tragedies Jephthes and Baptistes by George Buchanan and the streetwise sonnets from the Roman argot of Giuseppe Belli.
Musical women in the eighteenth century were generally keyboard players--instruments not prominent orchestrally.
If it heightens interest in the orchestrally accompanied French cantata or in the music of the unjustly neglected Batistin, it will have performed a valuable additional service.
The sonatas fall into three or four movements (defined by the editor as 'marked off by a full cadence and pause'), often made up of several shorter sections; they were as suited for sacred as for secular occasions, and some may even have been performed orchestrally.
Prominent people don't always grasp that the thoughts buzzing orchestrally in their brains are not uniformly brilliant.
She added: "I'd been in touch with Steve myself the end of last year because I was interested in performing Visage orchestrally.
Orchestrally this was a triumph, and almost so chorally, too.
Orchestrally, too, it is hard to imagine a more expert team, as the Vienna Philharmonic (conducted by Ingo Metzmacher) brings its singular confidence and virtuosity to bear on a fiendishly difficult score.