oppress

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Synonyms for oppress

subjugate

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depress

Synonyms

Synonyms for oppress

to do a wrong to; treat unjustly

to make sad or gloomy

Synonyms for oppress

come down on or keep down by unjust use of one's authority

cause to suffer

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Snyder, Peeler, and May (2008) described a consciousness raising process in a human behavior in the social environment sequence designed to help students examine their roles in oppressing others through the exercise of privilege associated with dominant social, religious, and cultural values, ideologies, economies, and media.
Their subjective and ideological formations have been colonized by oppressing, hegemonic discourses (McLaren, 1994).
America, which remembers itself as a "New Israel"--a nation of pilgrims and refugees who came to these shores seeking liberty, safety, and peace--must not become a "New Rome," oppressing and colonizing other peoples with our new found might.
It seems they fear that 'unlimited' spending by third parties during an election would harm "electoral fairness." They warned that there is a "danger" that "political advertising may manipulate or oppress the voters" (pretty oppressing reasons).
The fact of the matter is that, regardless of the national pronouncements of justice, the aim of the oppressing power at the local level was to completely suppress any type of effective response from the black population.
She argues that feminist analysis must account for the many discursive frameworks that constitute subjectivity and raise questions on a community-by-community basis, "asking when 'woman' is the most pressing oppressing opposition and what it means." [15] Fulkerson arrives at this position by first affirming Ferdinand de Saussure's structuralist account of language as a system of signs that are defined synchronically in opposition to each other, instead of being a series of labels that diachronically represent extradiscursive realities.
(1) Robert Cushman, pamphleteer for the Pilgrim migration, offered one version of this strategy when he said "the straitness of the place is such as each man is fain to pluck his means (as it were) out of his neighbor's throat, [and] there is such pressing and oppressing in towns and country, about farms, trade, traffic, etc.