opposable

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Related to opposability: manual dexterity, Opposable thumbs
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Synonyms for opposable

capable of being placed opposite to something

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References in periodicals archive ?
The principles governing the relative effect of treaties, the opposability of customary rules, and the capacity to present international claims reflect this individualization of those owing an obligation and those owed a right.
One limitation of the consent theory of treaty opposability to subdivisions is its seeming inapplicability to federations operating under Westminster-style constitutions.
Of course, the publicity regarding the establishment of the patrimony by appropriation must be made by registration with the electronic archive of movable securities when such patrimony by appropriation includes security rights for whose opposability the registration with the archive is required.
The alienation of the patrimony by appropriation of the merchant--natural person involves the conclusion of the legal document of alienation in compliance with the legal conditions as regards the validity and opposability of all legal operations comprised by this complicated legal document: sale, assignment of receivables, debt takeover, contract assignment, etc.
If we analyze the international jurisprudence on this matter, we find that the nationality opposability of a citizen towards some countries is subject to the existence "of an actual relationship with the state.
As a result of the constitutive character and of the absolute opposability of the decision of sex change, all legal consequences must be generated by the new legal sex of the transsexual person, which entails the recognition of her full matrimonial capacity, allowing her the conclusion of a marriage with a person having her sex of origin, otherwise, article 12 of the Convention is breached.
The first is that, as has been recognized by a significant body of opinion, "in the absence of clearly established general rules, the legal issue has continued to present itself in terms of the opposability of the claim to [an]other state rather than of the absolute legality or illegality of the claim erga omnes; in other words, in terms of the acceptance or acquiescence of other states.
In our opinion, there is much to commend the view that international law scholarship should focus on the central methodological importance of establishing the opposability of a customary rule to a particular state without always having to address complex questions about general customary international law.
With regard to that case, it will be observed with respect, that this theory overlooks the difference between material illegality and opposability.
In other words, it would seem possible to say that voluntarists differ from non-voluntarists only on the question of the opposability of universal customs to new states.