newsmonger


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Synonyms for newsmonger

Synonyms for newsmonger

a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

References in periodicals archive ?
The analogy of empiricism and essayism emphasizes not system but experience and observation--those qualities noted later by Henry James when he described Balzac's fiction as "social botanizing," and by Walter Benjamin when he famously characterized Baudelaire as "the flaneur who goes botanising on the asphalt." (5) A quintessentially Baconian project, the alliance of empiricism and essayism signals a watershed in the professionalization of letters as, in Hazlitt's nice summation, "the philosopher and wit here commences newsmonger" (6:95).
In newsrooms, as at newsstands across the country, difficult but vital questions about the methods and motives of the press are being raised, forcing newsmongers and consumers of news to question long-held assumptions.
Despite Right to Information laws in some places, verifying information is difficult even for the most credible of newsmongers. An arbitration of contested truths can be done through the courts, which is to really say, it can't because of the imperfections of our legal system.
Those killed and maimed constitute plain statistics for the newsmongers, nothing else.
Something big was brewing at Zimmer Holdings Inc., the newsmongers said, and the company seemed truly excited about it.
Her face was beamed live on national television and her story became fodder for newsmongers.
During the Civil War, opponents claimed that publicity was "obnoxious" because it "traded upon by newsmongers and the scandal-loving portion of the public." ZARITSKY, supra note 4, at 6-8.
The kings paid the messengers; patrons paid their newsmongers; the church paid the scribing monks; advertisers and subscribers paid for newspaper, TV, and radio news organizations.
Kaunitz writes every Post to Count Rosenberg, which letter is read before three or four newsmongers, who immediately fly all over town to disperse it, and is as immediately contradicted as the Post arrives from Holland, so that the news from Vienna is at present very little credited here.
Rutland, The Newsmongers: Journalism in the Life of the Nation, 1690-1972 (New York, 1973), 75-76, quoting Porcupine's Gazette, 4 March 1797; Emery, Press and America, 82.