neuroleptic

(redirected from neuroleptic malignant syndrome)
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Related to neuroleptic malignant syndrome: tardive dyskinesia, Serotonin syndrome
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Synonyms for neuroleptic

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Because of the patient's seizure history and possible phenytoin-induced fever, neurology was consulted and a diagnosis of NMS neuroleptic malignant syndrome was entertained because of the patient's use of olanzapine (Table 2).
Major Finding: The first consensus-based diagnostic criteria have been developed to help clinicians quickly identify symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome quickly to reduce morbidity and mortality.
In patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), differential diagnosis must be performed to rule out serotonin syndrome, (2) an underreported complication with similar findings.
High potency neuroleptics may induce the neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
Always be on the look out for serotonergic syndrome, which can look like neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
There is no convincing evidence that clozapine is associated with extrapyrarmdal symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or tardive dyskinesia, Dr.
In particular, up to 50 percent of people with LBD treated with any antipsychotic medication may experience dangerous side effects or potentially fatal symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
Serotonin Syndrome or Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)-like reactions: Before using BELVIQ, tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, especially medicines that treat depression, migraines, mental problems, or the common cold.
Metoclopramide can cause serious side effects including abnormal muscle movements, uncontrolled spasms of the face and neck muscles, or muscles of the body, arms, and legs, depression, thoughts of suicide, and suicide, and rarely but serious Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome and Parkinsonism.
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome : May develop in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs.
Other risks associated with quetiapine fumarate include but are not limited to neuroleptic malignant syndrome, diabetes mellitus, increased cholesterol and triglycerides, weight gain, increases and decreases in blood pressure, changes in blood counts, changes in ECGs and the formation of cataracts.
The development of a potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS)-like reactions have been reported with selective norepinephrine or serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs and SSRIs) alone, including fluoxetine treatment, but particularly with concomitant use of serotonergic drugs (including triptans), with drugs which impair metabolism of serotonin (including MAOIs), or with antipsychotics or other dopamine antagonists.
The development of a potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS)-like reactions have been reported with SNRIs and SSRIs alone, including fluoxetine treatment, but particularly with concomitant use of serotonergic drugs (including triptans) with drugs which impair metabolism of serotonin (including MAOIs), or with antipsychotics or other dopamine antagonists.
Symptoms suggestive of neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been reported with abrupt withdrawal of dopaminergic therapy.