nature


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  • noun

Synonyms for nature

Synonyms for nature

the totality of all existing things

a class that is defined by the common attribute or attributes possessed by all its members

the combination of emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities that distinguishes an individual

a basic trait or set of traits that define and establish the character of something

a person's customary manner of emotional response

Words related to nature

the essential qualities or characteristics by which something is recognized

a causal agent creating and controlling things in the universe

the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.

the complex of emotional and intellectual attributes that determine a person's characteristic actions and reactions

a particular type of thing

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References in classic literature ?
A painter told me that nobody could draw a tree without in some sort becoming a tree; or draw a child by studying the outlines of its form merely,--but, by watching for a time his motions and plays, the painter enters into his nature and can then draw him at will in every attitude.
Because a profound nature awakens in us by its actions and words, by its very looks and manners, the same power and beauty that a gallery of sculpture or of pictures addresses.
I have seen in the sky a chain of summer lightning which at once showed to me that the Greeks drew from nature when they painted the thunderbolt in the hand of Jove.
Since everything in nature answers to a moral power, if any phenomenon remains brute and dark it is that the corresponding faculty in the observer is not yet active.
It is nature the symbol, nature certifying the supernatural, body overflowed by life which he worships with coarse but sincere rites.
Beyond this universality of the symbolic language, we are apprised of the divineness of this superior use of things, whereby the world is a temple whose walls are covered with emblems, pictures, and commandments of the Deity,--in this, that there is no fact in nature which does not carry the whole sense of nature; and the distinctions which we make in events and in affairs, of low and high, honest and base, disappear when nature is used as a symbol.
Real character, he holds, the chief proper object of man's effort, is formed by quietly living, as did he and the dalesmen around him, in contact with Nature and communion with God rather than by participation in the feverish and sensational struggles of the great world.
Lyrical Ballads,' published in 1800, a discussion which includes incidentally some of the finest general critical interpretation ever made of the nature and meaning of poetry.
But to restrict poetry largely to such characters and subjects would be to eliminate not only most of the external interest of life, which certainly is often necessary in giving legitimate body to the spiritual meanings, but also a great range of significant experiences which by the nature of things can never come to lowly and simple persons.
In a state of nature almost every plant produces seed, and amongst animals there are very few which do not annually pair.
The face of Nature may be compared to a yielding surface, with ten thousand sharp wedges packed close together and driven inwards by incessant blows, sometimes one wedge being struck, and then another with greater force.
This view of the necessity of a large stock of the same species for its preservation, explains, I believe, some singular facts in nature, such as that of very rare plants being sometimes extremely abundant in the few spots where they do occur; and that of some social plants being social, that is, abounding in individuals, even on the extreme confines of their range.
And may we not say confidently of man also, that he who is likely to be gentle to his friends and acquaintances, must by nature be a lover of wisdom and knowledge?
Then it will be our duty to select, if we can, natures which are fitted for the task of guarding the city?
But are not these spirited natures apt to be savage with one another, and with everybody else?