mytilid


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Related to mytilid: Mytilus edulis, Mutillidae, Ostreidae, Gastropoda, cockle, Veneridae
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  • noun

Synonyms for mytilid

marine bivalve mollusk having a dark elongated shell

References in periodicals archive ?
Davies (1980) showed that there have been many misidentifications between the three mytilid species, B.
The identification of the mytilids Musculus virgiliae Barnard, Arcuatula capensis (Krauss) and Brachidontes variabilis Krauss, with corrections to the literature and a note on their distribution.
Connectivity cues from short term variability in settlement and geochemical tags of mytilid mussels.
Mytilid mussels: global habitat engineers in coastal sediments.
Intrusion of the freshwater mytilid mussel, Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857), into Japan.
The mytilid genus Bathymodiolus Kenk & Wilson, 1985, and related genera Gigantidas and Tamu within the subfamily Bathymodiolinae (Mollusca: Bivalvia), are among the most widespread of the vent and seep taxa (Fig.
Population structure and recruitment in mytilid bivalves from the Lucky Strike and Menez Gwen hydrothermal fields (37[degrees]17'N and 37[degrees]50'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge).
Bathymodiolin mussels also have functional digestive systems and, as in shallow-water mytilid mussels, cells of the digestive diverticulae are of two types: basophilic secretory cells and columnar digestive cells.
Ultrastructural, biochemical and immunological characterization of two populations of the mytilid mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: evidence for a dual symbiosis.
Ultrastructural, biochemical, and immunological characterization of two populations of the mytilid mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: evidence for a dual symbiosis.
Small mytilid bivalves found on decaying organic remains, such as whale bones, fish bones, wood and Nipa palm nuts, have been assigned in the past to a number of genera (e.
Ultrastructure of the gill of the hydrothermal-vent mytilid Buthymodiolus sp.
Though cestodes offer a discrepancy, most of the more common oyster parasites were unicellular, whereas most of the more common mytilid parasites were multicellular.
Indeed, these two species live in tubes adhering to the mytilid periostracum and the tube openings are near to the mussel siphons.