myrmecophile

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Words related to myrmecophile

an organism such as an insect that habitually shares the nest of a species of ant

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References in periodicals archive ?
BROSSUT, R., 1976.--Etude morphologique de la blatte myrmecophile Attaphila fungicola Wheeler.
Some myrmecophiles are small enough to live among the ants undetected without chemical mimicry [36], while others, such as Gamasomorpha maschwitzi, have alternative strategies to chemical mimicry which are to date poorly known but could consist of acoustical, behavioural, and/or morphological adaptations [68].
The presence and number of ant dealate females, alate females, males, workers, cocoons, and larvae, as well as the presence of any adult myrmecophile (especially eucharitid parasitoids), were recorded.
With respect to their relationship with ants, the caterpillars of this species may all be categorised as facultative myrmecophiles. If the appropriate species of ants are found in same places where the caterpillars live then symbiosis occurs; if not, the caterpillars develop adequately in their absence (Jordano 1987, Jordano et al.
The objectives of this research are to document the ant species present in the desert and note ecological relationships including myrmecophiles. Preliminary findings include the results of five collecting trips to Big Bend since the summer of 2000.
Le Masne, "Recherches sur la biologie des animaux myrmecophiles IV: observations sur le comportement de Paussus favieri Fairm, hote de la fourmi Pheidole pallidula Nyl." Annales de la Faculte des Sciences de Marseille, vol.
Apart from some scarce myrmecophiles found very occasionally within their nest, such as a gastropod, a small diplopod (Merocheta), a lepismatid or nicoletiid thysanuran, a worm infesting the refuse dumps, and a histerid beetle (Cook 1905; Perez-Lachaud & Lachaud, unpublished data), colonies of E.
Lomechusa and Lomechusoides are textbook examples for the integration of myrmecophiles in ant nests by the use of appeasement glands on their abdomen [6].