muleteer

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Synonyms for muleteer

a worker who drives mules

References in classic literature ?
We arrived home again finally, after a ten-mile excursion, and the irrepressible muleteers scampered at our heels through the main street, goading the donkeys, shouting the everlasting "Sekki-yah," and singing "John Brown's Body" in ruinous English.
When we were dismounted and it came to settling, the shouting and jawing and swearing and quarreling among the muleteers and with us was nearly deafening.
There was a muleteer to every donkey and a dozen volunteers beside, and they banged the donkeys with their goad sticks, and pricked them with their spikes, and shouted something that sounded like "Sekki- yah!" and kept up a din and a racket that was worse than Bedlam itself.
After remounting, Blucher said to the muleteer, "Now, that's enough, you know; you go slow hereafter."
A standard package for a two-day ascent of Toubkal, including guide, cooks, mules, muleteers, accommodation and food, costs PS200.
The muleteers, in charge of the mule caravans, kept the robbers at bay by asking the travellers for protection money before starting off on the journey.
Fortunately some Sa-skya muleteers were returning to their home and we changed our pung-de with theirs.
Debark's park office is where I first meet Alabacho, and arrange with him several mules and muleteers to carry everything we need.
Tracing the causes of Roman downfall, Winwood Reade wrote in 1872: "By day the Ostia Road was crowded with carts and muleteers, carrying to the great city the silks and spices of the East, the marble of Asia Minor, the timber of the Atlas, the grain of Africa and Egypt - and the carts brought nothing out but the loads of dung.
THE OTHER MULETEERS TRADERS OF THE VALLEYS, THE HIGHLANDS AND THE ATACAMA DESERT
The Nation's first system for classifying occupations was the 1850 Census of Population, which listed about 320 occupations (such as carpenters, dentists, and lawyers--but also ice dealers, muleteers, and philosophical instrument makers).
Those unconcerned about the decline of American manufacturing might want to read Winwood Reade's 1872 volume The Martyrdom of Man, in which he chronicled the economy of ancient Rome: "By day the Ostia road was crowded with carts and muleteers, carrying to the great city the silks and spices of the East, the marble of Asia Minor, the timber of the Atlas, the grain of Africa and Egypt; and the carts brought nothing out but loads of dung.