moral


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Related to moral: Moral development
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Synonyms for moral

Synonyms for moral

teaching morality

in accordance with principles of right or good conduct

being on a high intellectual or moral level

the principle taught by a fable or parable, for example

Synonyms

a rule or habit of conduct with regard to right and wrong or a body of such rules and habits

Synonyms for moral

the significance of a story or event

concerned with principles of right and wrong or conforming to standards of behavior and character based on those principles

psychological rather than physical or tangible in effect

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References in classic literature ?
And the moral of that is--"The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours."'
`I quite agree with you,' said the Duchess; `and the moral of that is--"Be what you would seem to be"--or if you'd like it put more simply--"Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise."'
`How fond she is of finding morals in things!' Alice thought to herself.
Much has been blind and discreditable, but the nature of the revolution is not affected by the vices of the revolters; for this is a purely moral force.
There is not, among the most religious and instructed men of the most religious and civil nations, a reliance on the moral sentiment and a sufficient belief in the unity of things, to persuade them that society can be maintained without artificial restraints, as well as the solar system; or that the private citizen might be reasonable and a good neighbor, without the hint of a jail or a confiscation.
I am no great admirator of your old morals, as you call them, for I have ever found, and I have liv'd long as it were in the very heart of natur', that your old morals are none of the best.
By morals I do not mean the limited and literal signification of the term, such as is conveyed in its synonyme, morality, but the practices of men, as connected with their daily intercourse, their institutions, and their laws."
"Your morals are exact enough for me," returned the old man, "for I think I see in them the very pride of folly.
"You're right--it is their morals; their wickedness and their pride, and chiefly their waste that has done it all!
His mind and eye were keen, besides, for moral qualities; he penetrated directly through all the pretenses of falsehood and hypocrisy; while how thoroughly he understood and respected honest worth appears in the picture of the Poor Parson in the Prolog to 'The Canterbury Tales.' Himself quiet and self-contained, moreover, Chaucer was genial and sympathetic toward all mankind.
Lowell has named in a suggestive summary the chief quality of each of the great English poets, with Chaucer standing first in order: 'Actual life is represented by Chaucer; imaginative life by Spenser; ideal life by Shakspere; interior life by Milton; conventional life by Pope.' We might add: the life of spiritual mysticism and simplicity by Wordsworth; the completely balanced life by Tennyson; and the life of moral issues and dramatic moments by Robert Browning.
The active moral impulse which Chaucer and Gower lacked, and a consequent direct confronting of the evils of the age, appear vigorously in the group of poems written during the last forty years of the century and known from the title in some of the manuscripts as 'The Vision of William Concerning Piers the Plowman.' From the sixteenth century, at least, until very lately this work, the various versions of which differ greatly, has been supposed to be the single poem of a single author, repeatedly enlarged and revised by him; and ingenious inference has constructed for this supposed author a brief but picturesque biography under the name of William Langland.
But the poem, though in its final state prolix and structurally formless, exhibits great power not only of moral conviction and emotion, but also of expression--vivid, often homely, but not seldom eloquent.
Its medieval form and setting remove it hopelessly beyond the horizon of general readers of the present time, yet it furnishes the most detailed remaining picture of the actual social and economic conditions of its age, and as a great landmark in the progress of moral and social thought it can never lose its significance.
From our examination of moral identity formation in families and in peer groups, it is clear that creating a warm, caring atmosphere in the classroom in which the students trust the teacher and that the students are free to question those teachings and to explore their own ideas of moral behavior, would likely enhance moral identity formation.