misread


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Synonyms for misread

Synonyms for misread

read or interpret wrongly

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interpret wrongly

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References in periodicals archive ?
I guess that any team that won the toss and found themselves in our position would be disappointed but I understand Notts would have bowled first as well, so maybe we both misread the pitch," he said.
But because of the poor legibility of the prescription, the pharmacist gave the same dose but the medication was misread as Plendil (felodipine), of which the maximum dose is 10 milligrams.
If both misread it, there's obviously some kind of error in how it was dealt with.
Many misread the hashtag as "Now That Cher Is Dead.
Why was I not told that they were misread either by the meter reader or by those who received the meter readings at npower?
His full version of events was heard for the first time as defence QC William Clegg said Tabak "completely misread the situation".
The misread and subsequently accepted payloads, coincidentally, generated the correct CkChr, thereby evading the data integrity check.
2 : misunderstand <He misread the emotion on her face.
Honda has been growing consistently thanks to surging sales in Brazil, Vietnam and Indonesia, but misread latent motorcycle demand in Africa, Eastern Europe, and most of Latin America, an executive said yesterday.
He misread how Iraqis would respond to the invasion.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) News Release "Fear Circuit Flares as Bipolar Youth Misread Faces", Monday, May 29, 2006
But in 1979, Barthes's essay was probably misread by American audiences as part of an ever-expanding encrustation of European interpretations on the body of Twombly's paintings (for example, by the German poet/dealer Heiner Bastian).
B Scanners could misread your code and retrieve the wrong person's medical records.
In one case, the clinician apparently misread the HSG, which other reviewers later determined did indeed document a cornual perforation.
People with amygdala-linked mental disorders such as mania and depression may perceive facial expressions differently than others do, thus fostering their previously reported tendency to misread others' intentions, Adolphs theorizes.