microbalance

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  • noun

Words related to microbalance

balance for weighing very small objects

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Yet another compelling feature of the microbalances is that they are impervious to external ambient influences at the place of installation.
Here we report methods for immobilizing anti-AFP MAbs on the surface of the gold electrode, the reusability of quartz coated with MAbs, and the operating stability of this quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor.
Various e-noses use different types of sensors, including metal oxide semiconductors, conducting polymers, surface acoustic waves, and quartz crystal microbalances.
Measurement of layer thickness during deposition is usually either by specially designed vibrating quartz crystal microbalances or optical means.
These types of sensor have been used for many years as so-called microbalances in the gas phase.
Contract notice: acquisition of microbalances, option: standard masses
About Colnatec - Taking a revolutionary approach to thin film design, development, and manufacturing, Colnatec manufactures the only commercially available heated quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) for process control of film thickness measurement in high temperature processes such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemi-cal vapor deposition (CVD).
With 6-g capacity and 0.1-[micro]g or 1-[micro]g readability, Excellence XP6U and XP2U ultra microbalances and the XP6 microbalance provide optimal measurement accuracy, user friendliness and quality standards.
Present e-nose instruments employ an array of chemical sensors based on conducting polymers, metal oxides, surface acoustic wave devices, quartz crystal microbalances, or combinations of these devices.
Its microbalances, analytical, and precision balances, as well as industrial bench scales have set benchmarks in quality and often last much longer than rival devices, said Frost & Sullivan Research Director Kiran Unni.