mescal bean


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Related to mescal bean: Sophora secundiflora
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Synonyms for mescal bean

shrub or small tree having pinnate leaves poisonous to livestock and dense racemes of intensely fragrant blue flowers and red beans

References in periodicals archive ?
Frank Ross)' On the top of the first page is written: "Report of Indian Pow-wow Jan 21,1908 considering the 'Mescal Bean' Bill)' These notes record the key points made by seven speakers: three Peyotists, Quanah Parker (Comanche), Otto Wells (Kiowa), and Black Dog (Osage); an Indian non-Peyotist, Joseph Pointer (Cheyenne-Arapaho); the Indians' lawyer, T.
Quanah Parker began by saying: "The Mescal Bean cannot be eaten, a drink is made of it but it is the piote bean we eat or use as a medicine."
Black Dog of the Osage spoke last, saying that he had used peyote for years but not the mescal bean:
I have used the peoti bean for ten years but not the mescal bean. I use the peoti bean in my religious ceremonies.
Those against the use of peyote based their arguments on the supposedly detrimental effects of longtime usage of the mescal bean and the amount of time the Indians spent in peyote meetings.
Springer, a Peyotist from the Iowa tribe, stated that his tribe uses the little red mescal bean as an ornament, and they call it "red medicine." He has a vest with the beans on it for buttons, and when he dresses up he puts it on in addition to his leather leggings.
Mescal Beans--It shall be unlawful for any person to introduce on any Indian reservation or Indian allotment situated within this State, or to have in possession, barter, sell, give, or otherwise dispose of, any 'Mescal Bean,' or the product of any such drug, to any allotted Indian in this state: Provided, that nothing in this act shall prevent its use by any physician authorized under existing laws to practice his profession in this State." "Section 1862.
(59.) "Quanah Parker Wants Beyoute: Will Go to Guthrie to Fight Proposed Mescal Bean Law," Oklahoman, December 18, 1907, 8.
(63.) "Mescal Bean and Peyote Bill: Indian Religious Services--Peyote in Oklahoma City Times," Weekly Times Journal, January 24, 1908, 4.
(36) With the full support of the BIA commissioner, Indian agent Colonel Woodson at the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency worked with political leaders to introduce a law at the 1899 session of the Oklahoma territorial legislature to prohibit Indian medicine men from practicing their incantations and using "mescal beans." (37) On March 7, 1899, a bill passed the House prohibiting the practices of Indian "medicine" men and the sale of the mescal beans to Indians.
It shall be unlawful for any person to introduce on any Indian Reservation or Indian allotment situated within this Territory or to have in possession, barter, sell, give, or otherwise dispose of any "mescal beans" or the product of any such drug, to any allotted Indian in this territory: Provided, That nothing in this Act shall prevent its use by any physician authorized under existing laws to practice his profession in this Territory.
Quanah Parker, chief of the Comanche Indians, has returned from Guthrie with the assurance from President Murray and other delegates to the constitutional convention that no provision of the constitution will prevent the sale and eating of mescal beans among the Indians of the new state.
Shell, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Agency superintendent, says that these three "willfully and unlawfully have in their possession 'Mescal Beans' and dispose of said 'Mescal Beans' to other allotted Indians all of which is against the peace and dignity of the Territory of Oklahoma." (52) The Cheyenne Peyotists, led by Reuben Taylor, hired attorney D.