melanism


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  • noun

Synonyms for melanism

a condition characterized by abnormal deposits of melanin (especially in the skin)

References in periodicals archive ?
The genetic basis of melanism in the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis).
1945: Evolutionary studies on the distribution and dynamics of melanism in the hamster (Cricetus cricetus L.
Scientists say that this bird has a rare genetic condition known as melanism, which causes him to produce much more pigment melanin than his pink counterparts, resulting in his distinctive color.
For example, melanism, like blonde hair in humans, can be achieved by a variety of mechanisms; field mice may choose to use mc1r or not.
Melanism in Phigalia titea (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in southern New England: a response to forest disturbance?
Melanism in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) is associated with a deletion of Phenylalanine-256 in the MC1R gene.
In 2010, we scored the phenotypes of 81 gull pairs at the Protection Island colony using an index based on plumage melanism and bare-part coloration.
Melanism is an increased amount of black or nearly black pigmentation (Acevedo and Aguayo, 2008; McBride and Giordano, 2010; Marin-Vasquez et al.
Grant, "Allelic Melanism in American and British Peppered Moths, "Journal of Heredity 95:2 (2004), 97-102.
One of the most studied and a polemic case of crypsis is the Industrial Melanism described in Great Britain for moths of the genus Biston Leach, 1815.
Ecology becomes central in the second and longest chapter, "A Green Machine," in which a cryptic discussion of the concept of an ecosystem precedes a treatment of standard ecological topics, including adaptation, industrial melanism, the Galapagos finches, niches, and food webs.
Insect melanism has long been a case study in evolutionary biology, providing some of the most conspicuous examples of natural selection (Kettlewell, 1973), genetic regulation (Wittkopp et al.
This single supergene also appears important in melanism in other species, including moths.