melancholy


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Synonyms for melancholy

Synonyms for melancholy

Synonyms for melancholy

a constitutional tendency to be gloomy and depressed

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a humor that was once believed to be secreted by the kidneys or spleen and to cause sadness and melancholy

characterized by or causing or expressing sadness

Synonyms

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grave or even gloomy in character

References in periodicals archive ?
Melancholy, with its "traditional" definition (getting back to furor, as in furor poeticus) by Shakespeare's Jacques in As You Like It ("I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is emulation, nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the courtier's, which is proud; nor the soldier's, which is ambitious; nor the lawyer's, which is politic; nor the lady's, which is nice; nor the lover's, which is all these; but it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed, the sundry contemplation of my travels, in which my rumination often wraps me in a most humorous sadness"), Robert Burton's most extensive description in his Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) and Dr.
If we regard Henry as Shakespeare's first great attempt at representing a melancholy or depressed character, a precursor to Hamlet and Jaques, or King Lear and Timon of Athens for that matter, we may also theorize that at this stage in his career, Shakespeare was still experimenting with how best to construct a tragic protagonist whose flaw is "melancholy as a character defect, not [necessarily] an illness" (Shaw 94) as a modern reader might think of depression.
Dabbing and elk hunters make bloody companions in The Melancholy Howl, the fifth Allison Coil mystery from Mark Stevens.
Is the subject of melancholy, which is already so richly explored, an exhausted topic?
Melancholy and the Landscape: Locating Sadness, Memory and Reflection in the Landscape
For some authors, the poet is in addition defined by a melancholy temperament, which either comes from birth or evolves over time given the mental requirements of poetry writing, and which ensues from an overdeveloped imagination ultimately conducive to disease or insanity.
Cultural Melancholy: Readings of Race, Impossible Mourning, and African American Ritual.
YEAR on year The Pogues melancholy hit Fairytale of New York tops favourite Christmas song lists so it seems only fitting that the Irish band have launched their own whiskey in time for Christmas.
Critique: "Melancholy Manor" is a riveting read from beginning to end and wonderfully showcases the literary talents of author.
In this context he includes a fairly long chapter on melancholy, (25) in which he distinguishes between three types--epigastric, encephalic, and general--a division that goes back to Rufus of Ephesus.
Inform them that they will be making a "feelings" picture with a few of these same colors, as well as black and white, just as Degas did in Melancholy.
My essay in honor of her work tests a blue/s-print for this difference in the field of "melancholy." Despite a mirror in the first three letters, this mood does not spell the warmth and good humor of a Mehor, though its issues have been her devotions.
Marsilio Ficino's (1433-1499) Three Books of Life, which deals with the health hazards of intellectual pursuits and Robert Burton's (1577-1640) widely read and highly influential The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) are also especially important literary sources.
In the late Renaissance, melancholy could seem all show: a composite of posture and gesture (slumped; the head leaning on one hand; Fig.
melancholy yet desperate for coreason for her downbeat mood as the pair bond over the course going to dance rehearsals and garound London looking glum.