meant


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Synonyms for meant

References in classic literature ?
'If I'd meant that, I'd have said it,' said Humpty Dumpty.
I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you!"'
'I meant by "impenetrability" that we've had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you'd mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don't mean to stop here all the rest of your life.'
It is only in thinking back to there that I can realize how much they might always have meant to me.
"Those spots didn't mean anything to me, but to the doctor they meant measles."
Is the conversational interaction among author, text, and reader meant to lead to meaning or is the interplay itself the meaning?
Word History: At first the word garble meant "to sift" or "to sort or pick out." If you pick out a few misleading parts of a message and report only those parts, you distort the message, and so garble came to mean "to distort." It is the meaning "sift," however, that reflects the origin of garble.
The reason for doing such research, which is a key point in Martin's essay, is to discover what a word meant in the context being studied--in this case 1 Cor 6:9-10.
However, if we demote meaning and instead promote body image and ego, then our inclination towards perfection, meant for our inner qualities, will transfer to the perfection of externals.
Rather, the poems in Love's Alchemy are like a fine merlot, meant to be imbibed slowly--you begin by sniffing their aroma; then hold them up to the light and savor their color; inhale their bouquet; hold the words in your mouth, let the taste of them sink into your pores; feel them warming your throat, let their wisdom spread through your veins and into the depths of your heart.
Originally, separation meant that no secular prince can rightly usurp an ecclesiastical office.
The book admirably succeeds in its first goal, but falls short in its attempt to understand what sugar actually meant to people.
When they wrote in the First Amendment that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," they meant that religion should be free from government support or control.