mean


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to mean: standard deviation
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • adj
  • noun

Synonyms for mean

matter

Synonyms

  • matter
  • be significant
  • have significance
  • have importance

Synonyms for mean

to have or convey a particular idea

to have in mind as a goal or purpose

having or proceeding from low moral standards

of little distinction

lacking high station or birth

affected or tending to be affected with minor health problems

hard to treat, manage, or cope with

something, as a type, number, quantity, or degree, that represents a midpoint between extremes on a scale of valuation

that by which something is accomplished or some end achieved

all things, such as money, property, or goods, having economic value

Synonyms for mean

an average of n numbers computed by adding some function of the numbers and dividing by some function of n

mean or intend to express or convey

have as a logical consequence

Synonyms

Related Words

denote or connote

have in mind as a purpose

destine or designate for a certain purpose

approximating the statistical norm or average or expected value

Synonyms

Related Words

characterized by malice

Synonyms

Related Words

having or showing an ignoble lack of honor or morality

Related Words

marked by poverty befitting a beggar

Synonyms

Related Words

(used of persons or behavior) characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity

(used of sums of money) so small in amount as to deserve contempt

Synonyms

Related Words

of no value or worth

Synonyms

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
We have thus, in addition to our four previous ways in which words can mean, two new ways, namely the way of memory and the way of imagination.
When we understand a word, there is a reciprocal association between it and the images of what it "means." Images may cause us to use words which mean them, and these words, heard or read, may in turn cause the appropriate images.
'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you CAN make words mean so many different things.'
'I meant by "impenetrability" that we've had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you'd mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don't mean to stop here all the rest of your life.'
You mean when money is not wanted, but allowed to lie?
Well, there is another question: By friends and enemies do we mean those who are so really, or only in seeming?
Communism deprives no man of the power to appropriate the products of society; all that it does is to deprive him of the power to subjugate the labour of others by means of such appropriation.
Is not that also social, and determined by the social conditions under which you educate, by the intervention, direct or indirect, of society, by means of schools, etc.?
For instance, the same sound, SIE, means YOU, and it means SHE, and it means HER, and it means IT, and it means THEY, and it means THEM.
That seems descriptive enough, but still it is not exact enough for a German; so he precedes the word with that article which indicates that the creature to follow is feminine, and writes it down thus: "die Engla"nderinn,"--which means "the she-Englishwoman." I consider that that person is over-described.
I apologized; but he continued scornfully, "Since you are impervious to argument, you shall hear with your ears how by means of my two voices I reveal my shape to my Wives, who are at this moment six thousand miles seventy yards two feet eight inches away, the one to the North, the other to the South.
He was one day engaged with Mr Allworthy in a discourse on charity: in which the captain, with great learning, proved to Mr Allworthy, that the word charity in Scripture nowhere means beneficence or generosity.
'I said,' was the reply, made with that former gleam of determination, 'that I would find her out by any means, fair or foul.
I conceived of its effect then, but I conceived of it as a misfortune, a fatality; now I am by no means sure that it was so; hereafter the creation of beauty, as we call it, for beauty's sake, may be considered something monstrous.
[1309a] if office brought no profit; by which means both the rich and the poor will enjoy what they desire; for to admit all to a share in the government is democratical; that the rich should be in office is aristocratical.