marsh marigold


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Synonyms for marsh marigold

swamp plant of Europe and North America having bright yellow flowers resembling buttercups

References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, marsh marigold (as its moniker suggests) grows in places where frogs can be found.
Whether photographing wildfowl with a telephoto zoom or a damselfly on a marsh marigold with a macro lens, you'll need a tripod to give yourself the best chance of crisply focused images
He said: "With the cost of buying horses now, it is important that we breed our own and that is why three winning mares I have - Marsh Marigold, Silver Gift and Just Bev - who have won nigh on 30 races between them are being sent to top class stallions.
Hednesford trainer Joe Fierro brought Marsh Marigold back in trip for the 0-90 hurdle and was rewarded when the Tina's Pet mare ran out a game winner under Pipe's 5lb claimer Jofret Huet.
Seeds that benefit from such quick planting include pasque flower, columbine and marsh marigold.
I once gave myself a very anxious time when I ate a marsh marigold bud before it was cooked when I was making capers; the texture was delicious but the experiment will not be repeated
The wetland area consists of a pond and bog plants such as marsh marigold, creeping Jenny, greater spearwort, and many more.
The ground is a dazzling carpet of bluebells, red campion, fragrant wild garlic, cow parsley, marsh marigold, meadow sweet and wild daffodil.
6) Top plants to consider include: marsh marigold with yellow flowers, bog arum with white flowers, miniaturereed-mace, perfect for those who love bulrushes but don't have the space, water forget-me-not with stunningly pretty pale blue flowers, and bog iris with its rich purple blooms.
The young leaves and unopened flower buds of marsh marigold (Calthapalustris) are poisonous when raw, but can be eaten when cooked, but only with extreme caution.
Water lilies will provide landing areas for dragon and damselflies, while marsh marigold and water mint at the edges will provide food and shelter for insects and small creatures.
The dyes will come from a number of traditional dye plants formerly used in the Highlands, including hawthorn, marsh marigold and yellow flag iris.
Giuseppe Fierro enjoyed a memorable first visit to Hexham on Saturday when Marsh Marigold opened his account at the Yarridge Heights venue in the mares' handicap hurdle, writes Gordon Brown.
Flowers that fill such dual roles include marsh marigold, true forget-me-nots, cardinal flowers, great lobelia, yellow coneflower, bee balm, swamp milkweed, Joe-Pye-weed, lance-leaved goldenrod and New England aster.
Marsh marigold is a literal translation of its scientific name: Latin Caltha for "marigold" and palustris for "swampy.