malign

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Synonyms for malign

Synonyms for malign

strongly suggestive of great harm, menace, or evil

Synonyms for malign

evil or harmful in nature or influence

having or exerting a malignant influence

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References in periodicals archive ?
These disparities result in billions of dollars of direct US federal aid to Israel--more than $3.1 billion every year to Israel, on average $6.8 million per day--while Detroit languishes.[13] This, of course, doesn't include any of the hundreds of billions of dollars malignly misappropriated for invading and occupying Iraq just since 2003.
They become one more of the complexities malignly hovering over the encounter with a patient.
For Melville to call the stutter evidence of the universal badness, was carelessly (or malignly) to bring his philosophy of fallen man (as much a soured humor as philosophy) into his farewell work.
I am particularly intrigued by Summers's examination of the poor casting, especially for the character of Dareing, and his speculation that those who staged the play had sabotaged it: "Indeed, it would seem that the casting was done on purpose perversely and malignly to damn the play" (219).
He announces his presence by enunciating, in the exaggerated manner of stage melodrama, "Your soft white flesh is mine," while cackling malignly. Butch is admittedly a badman, and we have not learned at this point in the film that he and Etta are very dear friends.
They're a charming, tolerant, multilingual, and hospitable nation, yet for centuries they've been malignly stereotyped by the English language.
As Sola Sierras said, the country was a cemetery and bodies disappeared ever more malignly. Many people went to live in the Atacama Desert, and others in Pisagua, but no one talked about that.
By taking us inside the mind of Francis Dolarhyde, a killer as piteous as he is malignly magnificent and terrifying, Harris suggested that serial killers are made, not born; they are twisted sensitives avenging, misdirectedly, the murder of their own innocence, and so forging the next random link in an endless chain of suffering.