maiolica


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Synonyms for maiolica

highly decorated earthenware with a glaze of tin oxide

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The present volume is another catalogue of a collection, but in this case of what Wilson believes to be 'the most important and substantial assemblage of sixteenth-century maiolica in private hands anywhere'.
Culinary and Table Styling Session with Maiolica and Miele Image Credit: Supplied
Groundwater of the Alzabove spring takes origin from the contact between Maiolica Fm.
(12.) 'Tazze e sottocoppe in maiolica di Castel Durante ornate d'istoriette mitologiche [...] ove sotto le figure erano scritti in carattere corsivo a zaffara nera esametri d'Ovidio' (p.
An aggravating factor in the appearance of white spots is the very nature of the gloss, low fire glazes employed in current Maiolica ware.
Maiolica et al., "SCFFW3 controls the oscillation of the circadian clock by directing the degradation of cryptochrome proteins," Science, vol.
Today's buyers of Grand Tour souvenirs should watch out for micro-mosaic panels and jewellery made up of small fragments of coloured stone, clay or glass; Italian carved shell cameos, of which Florence was an important centre; Italian maiolica pottery; prints of Italian landscapes and topographical subjects; Sienna marble temple models from the Roman Forum; travelling trunks and other fitted luggage; books and maps; bronzes and paintings by lesser English artists, not forgetting Lot 1642.
The majority were in terracotta and maiolica, but other materials were also represented, such as plaster (Swimmer Who Exits from the Water), stone (Leda and the Swan), marble (Swimmer's Dive), bronze and wood (Head of Medusa).
Tin-glazed wares--known in Italian as maiolica, in English as majolica, and in other languages sometimes as faience or delftware--(11) were integral to most daily life activities in Renaissance Spain, and in the colonial viceroyalties in the New World they became an essential symbol of Spanish ethnicity and social status.
Faience is the term for tin-glazed pottery produced in France, Germany and Scandinavia, the name deriving from the Italian town of Faenza, although, rather confusingly, the Italian version itself is called maiolica.
The gallery of domestic art includes a display of 15th-century ceramics (maiolica) while another explores the relation of painting to sculpture.
The Art of Collecting exhibits one hundred of the ROM's best examples of European and American decorative art, from rare maiolica to Art Deco silver.
Xanto Avelli worked in maiolica, earthenware made on a wheel.
The exhibits also include, a rare Maiolica Albarello dating back to 16th century Italy with the portrait of Ibn Sina (Avicenna), a magnificent royal casket mounted with Lapis Lazuli and set with gold and diamonds from England dating back to the 19th century, a fine gem set jade box from India and a fine intact Kashan lustre star tile with Mangol figures suggesting impact of the Mangol invasion on Iran.
The richly coloured, lustrous, tin-based Maiolica glaze is painted by hand to create each unique flower head.