mainmast


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Words related to mainmast

the chief mast of a sailing vessel with two or more masts

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References in classic literature ?
Old man Hasken o' the "East Wind" - Troop seemed to be talking to himself - "he tripped on a hatch an' butted the mainmast with his head - hardish.
Troop regarded the top of the mainmast with deep interest for a while, as Harvey harangued fiercely all around him.
Swiftly she sank, and no more than a matter of moments was it when the stump of her mainmast was gone.
The fifth sailor, rifle in hand, was standing guard by the water-tank just for'ard of the mainmast.
I can see it now, the water-tank, the mainmast, the gang hanging on to him, the hatchet descending on the back of his head, and all under the blazing sunlight.
The cap at the mainmast head was broken out, and sheet and downhaul pulled flat, amid a scattering rifle fire from the boats; and the Mary Rebecca lay over and sprang ahead faster than ever.
There was the mainmast, fifteen inches in diameter at what was now the butt, still sixty-five feet in length, and weighing, I roughly calculated, at least three thousand pounds.
All the stern and quarter of her were beaten to pieces by the sea; and as her forecastle, which stuck in the rocks, had run on with great violence, her mainmast and foremast were brought by the board - that is to say, broken short off; but her bowsprit was sound, and the head and bow appeared firm.
We remained there about thirteen days, got some refreshment on shore, and put to sea again, though we met with very bad weather again, in which the ship sprung her mainmast, as they called it, for I knew not what they meant.
I got to London in about three weeks, where I heard a little while after that the ship was arrived in Bristol, but at the same time had the misfortune to know that by the violent weather she had been in, and the breaking of her mainmast, she had great damage on board, and that a great part of her cargo was spoiled.
But I might as well have talked to the mainmast of the ship: they were mad upon their journey; only they gave me good words, and begged I would not be angry; that they did not doubt but they would be back again in about an hour at furthest; for the Indian town, they said, was not above half-a mile off, though they found it above two miles before they got to it.
As soon as we had crawled on deck I used to take a round turn with a rope about the men, the pumps, and the mainmast, and we turned, we turned incessantly, with the water to our waists, to our necks, over our heads.
The launch has begun with the welding of a coin at the base of what was once the mainmast, a custom considered to bring good luck.
At the time I was working forward at the foot of mainmast and glanced up as I felt our speed gather under the 50-foot swell and then stared in abject fear as the mizzen mast began moving across my position as we started to broach.
She had Dutch colours painted on her sides in four different places, and also carried a rigid painted ensign at the fore-masthead, a painted rigid house flag at the mainmast, and port of registry on her side.