machine-readable text


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Words related to machine-readable text

electronic text that is stored as strings of characters and that can be displayed in a variety of formats

References in periodicals archive ?
It needs to be stated that to present these formulaic findings in such user-friendly fashion is a great help to readers, countering the argument that a machine-readable text might be equally useful.
Machine-readable text from authors is gradually lowering costs and reducing time as authoring and publishing systems become better integrated (Lynch, 1994; Lacy, 1993) and, as electronic transmission is used more in the review process, additional time will be saved.
Most printed documents start as machine-readable text and can easily be published electronically through an information system.
The "digital ink" then can be transmitted to a central location where the handwritten input is converted to machine-readable text for storage and processing.
This software creates machine-readable text from page images.
It would have been a simple matter to tag italics in the machine-readable text, and to use a word-processor macro to convert them back to italics proper for the printed version.
While machine-readable texts, along with the indexing and text retrieval software that make possible amazing feats of textual comparison and analysis, have been available for several decades, only with the advent of the space-generous CD-ROM have they become widespread commercially.
Two sets of machine-readable texts were obtainable for the experiment: a set of 7 Marlowe plays from Louis Ule, identical to the texts in his Olms Marlowe concordance published in 1979; a set of 36 Shakespeare plays available in modern English spelling from the University of Bradford.
While machine-readable texts (MRTs), along with the indexing and text retrieval software that make possible amazing feats of textual comparison and analysis, have been available for several decades, only with the advent of the space-generous CD-ROM have they become widespread commercially.
The only attempt to create a systematic catalog of electronic texts in the humanities using standard bibliographic procedures is the Rutgers Inventory of Machine-Readable Texts in the Humanities, which began in 1983 in response to a growing number of enquiries about the availability of electronic texts.