loiter


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for loiter

Synonyms for loiter

to go or move slowly so that progress is hindered

to pass time without working or in avoiding work

Synonyms for loiter

References in periodicals archive ?
According to her, most of the people who loiter around the galleries are criminally-minded.
Other sources credit it with a 21-kW Cuyuna engine, a loiter speed of 145 km/h and an endurance of eight hours.
Upon reaching a gross weight with an acceptable two engine rate of climb, I loitered the No.
It was based on the Vagrancy Act 1824 which made it "illegal for a suspected person or reputed thief to frequent or loiter in a public place with intent to commit an arrestable offence".
Louts can infringe our right to a peaceful community, yet we can't infringe their right to loiter."
Sometimes//these decisions are impossible-/avoid the brush or avoid the edge./You brought wild mule's ear to punctuate/our talk, and said words such as It's already too late//that calcified like tooth./Your sunburn peels loiter at my house.
To measure how long light pulses loiter, the team split a 150-fs infrared laser pulse into two pulses and sent each along a different path to the same detector.
Short-legged jets could not loiter above the battlefield, and airfields in country were not yet available.
Children and teenagers would loiter in the "bright lights sections"--the major shopping and entertainment districts--listening to the music that spilled out of concert saloons and waiting for excitement.
To loiter with intent might be a crime, and this lively account of the literature of loitering is anything but, unless the intent is to elude intent.
In a part of the plurality opinion not subscribed to by the majority, Justice John Paul Stevens reiterated the holding of Papachristou that "the freedom to loiter for innocent purposes is part of the `liberty' protected by the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment."(22) The plurality further faulted the ordinance for its failure to provide notice to citizens as to what conduct is prohibited.(23) Finally, the plurality implied that it might be necessary for a city to show that loitering was for a criminal purpose,(24) but it was clear that O'Connor and Breyer (plus the three dissenters) would not have required this.
Witnesses at city council public hearings testified that gang members loiter as part of a strategy to claim territory, recruit new members, and intimidate rival gangs and ordinary community residents.
The United States Supreme Court similarly noted that the ordinance reaches "a substantial amount of innocent conduct."(22) Writing for the majority, Justice John Paul Stevens remarked, "It matters not whether the reason that a gang member and his father, for example, might loiter near Wrigley Field is to rob an unsuspecting fan or just to get a glimpse of Sammy Sosa leaving the ballpark."(23) In either case, an officer must order the couple to move along if their purpose for standing there is not obvious.
The second element of the proffered analysis is the most important one to understand, i.e., what the courts consider to be "incipient criminal conduct." This encompasses that portion of the loitering and prowling statute prohibiting "any person to loiter or prowl in a place, at a time or in a manner not usual for law-abiding individuals, under circumstances that warrant a justifiable and reasonable alarm or immediate concern for the safety of persons or property in the vicinity."