listen


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Synonyms for listen

hear

Synonyms

pay attention

Synonyms

Synonyms for listen

to make an effort to hear something

to perceive by ear, usually attentively

Synonyms for listen

listen and pay attention

pay close attention to

Synonyms

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References in periodicals archive ?
The best way to understand people is to listen to them - Ralph G.
Listening through multimedia is considered worth because students can listen and understand when things will be highlighted in front of them.
Click Description (optional)" and write "Listen to the Music selection and answer the questions in Section 3".
It will start by showing what the first song they listened to in 2018 was, as well.
While for others as you listen to their story, you can pick out possible chance of reconciliation.
Bokser (2005) also remarks on the lack of attention to listening in writing center scholarship and argues that listening can be foregrounded in tutor education so that tutors become more aware of how they listen.
ListenWiFi, Listen Technologies' pro audio streaming solution will become Audio Everywhere from Listen Technologies, offering a plug and play, low-latency solution for assistive listening that can operate on a venue's existing wireless network.
Not surprisingly, Americans who are employed listen to AM/FM radio more than those who don't work.
Come up with a list of your own power questions that set you apart from other agents and allow you to listen perceptively.
Before we can teach our students the ability to listen critically, we must first impart a more fundamental skill: how to hear music in silence.
The cycle includes a short prelistening planning/predicting stage; three listening verification stages where students listen to the passage, verify their understanding, select and use listening strategies to address their comprehension problems, and evaluate their strategy use; and finally a reflection stage where students write about or discuss what they have learned about their strategic listening processes, and then set goals for improving their strategy use in future listening tasks.
More specifically, in her discourses, I argue that Dworkin urges audiences to: acknowledge the complexities of listening to painful experiences while performing listening with forbearance and rigor; view listening as sacred and to enact listening with no expectation of personal gain; recognize that failing to listen enables oppressive structures to reproduce; listen to those who have "no claim" to speak; and recognize that personal stories have the potential to provide concrete knowledge that may serve as the basis of challenging social structures and motivating collective action.
When they do converse, they expect their physician leaders to listen with "clinical ears" and to view things through the same "clinical lens" as they do.
In compassionate listening, one attempts to shed all preconceptions and listen in a purely sympathetic manner, but the problem with this is that the listener's own viewpoint is subordinated (p.
Goal number four emphasizes pupils having numerous opportunities to listen and to improve therein.