lionize

(redirected from lionised)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for lionize

Synonyms for lionize

assign great social importance to

References in periodicals archive ?
Once a lionised image of something is ensconced in your imagination, you are bound to become uncritical at least about that image.
Hali's notion of England was conjectured out of the lionised image that the colonial masters of the 19th century were broadcasting through architecture, institutions, the press, speeches and textbooks and it was all about concealing coloniality under the garb of modernity.
O'Learys of are lionised able to millions There is a wind of change blowing and across the water where even Conservatives are calling for the privatised railways to be re-nationalised because they are more inefficient and expensive than when they were publicly owned.
Michael O'Learys of this world are lionised for being able to pocket multi-millions
Moore was lionised among his contemporaries for his drinking.
PREMIERE Jimmy Cliff is among the Jamaican reggae legends paying tribute to the great Bob Marley (above), a man lionised in life and deified in death.
Actions speak louder than words, Mr Prime Minister, and your cuts betray the very people you lionised. Heaven help Cumbria if monsoons return under the Cut-servatives.
Lionised in Brazil and a tiger with Portugal, Big Phil's proved a pussycat with Chelsea.
UNION leaders will be lionised today by right wingers who, for the other 364 days of the year, denounce them as dinosaurs.
It's hard to believe that players lionised at European level can be demonised internationally.
IAN BELL found himself being lionised by TWO Prime Ministers after looking at England's Ashes triumph through cricket's dreaded pair of spectacles.
If he were a Yank, Frost would be lionised like Johnny Carson or Walter Cronkite.
HEADLINE-CASE: Zidane lionised; HEADLINE-CASE: Raul
HE'S loved by cinemagoers, lionised by critics and positively lusted after by women.
THEY sang the hokey-cokey when the football was naff and lionised boy wonder Joe Cole with a jingle from pop relics Spandau Ballet's back catalogue.