learning

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Synonyms for learning

Synonyms for learning

known facts, ideas, and skill that have been imparted

Synonyms for learning

References in classic literature ?
A life of peaceful study was no longer possible, the learning of two hundred years was swept away, the lamp of knowledge lit by the monks grew dim and flickered out.
He loved books, and he longed to bring back to England something of the learning which had been lost.
By "this side of the Humber" Alfred means the south side, for now the center of learning was no longer Northumbria, but Wessex.
Though conscious of the difficulty of learning without a teacher, I set out with high hope, and a fixed purpose, at whatever cost of trou- ble, to learn how to read.
In the second place, instinct often gives only a rough outline of the sort of thing to do, in which case learning is necessary in order to acquire certainty and precision in action.
To take extreme cases, every animal at birth can take food by instinct, before it has had opportunity to learn; on the other hand, no one can ride a bicycle by instinct, though, after learning, the necessary movements become just as automatic as if they were instinctive.
Jenny had, by her learning, increased her own pride, which none of her neighbours were kind enough to feed with the honour she seemed to demand; and now, instead of respect and adoration, she gained nothing but hatred and abuse by her finery.
Many of them cried out, "They thought what madam's silk gown would end in;" others spoke sarcastically of her learning.
Yes, I was learning how noble politics and politicians are.
Thus our parting daily loseth Something of its bitter pain, And while learning this hard lesson, My great loss becomes my gain.
I used to think I couldn't let you go, but I'm learning to feel that I don't lose you, that you'll be more to me than ever, and death can't part us, though it seems to.
His merits, his learning, his quality of immediate vassal of the Bishop of Paris, threw the doors of the church wide open to him.
There, plunged more deeply than ever in his dear books, which he quitted only to run for an hour to the fief of Moulin, this mixture of learning and austerity, so rare at his age, had promptly acquired for him the respect and admiration of the monastery.
In remorse the Sovereign Elector deprived himself of political influence by learning to read.
So labour at your Alphabet, For by that learning shall you get To lands where Fairies may be met.