leaning


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Related to leaning: leaning towards
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Synonyms for leaning

Synonyms for leaning

Synonyms for leaning

an inclination to do something

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a natural inclination

the property possessed by a line or surface that departs from the vertical

the act of deviating from a vertical position

departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontal

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References in classic literature ?
"Because," said the Man Leaning on a Spade, "I belong to the Gravediggers' National Extortion Society, and we have decided to limit the production of graves and get more money for the reduced output.
He always seemed to be leaning on his spade, always gazing out seawards in the same intent, fascinated way.
"Say, Pete," said Maggie, leaning forward, "dis is great."
The young squire was leaning forward, gazing at the stirring and martial scene, when he heard a short, quick gasp at his shoulder, and there was the Lady Maude, with her hand to her heart, leaning up against the wall, slender and fair, like a half-plucked lily.
The grave Gower, announcing in advance a sermon of several hours, begged him to be seated, and to the murmur of his wise talk, his head leaning on the window frame, the child slept peacefully.
"And I," she said, lowering her tone and leaning towards him, "one very stupid, idiotic day."
And there with the strained craft steeply leaning over to it, by reason of the enormous downward drag from the lower mast-head, and every yard-arm on that side projecting like a crane over the waves; there, that blood-dripping head hung to the Pequod's waist like the giant Holofernes's from the girdle of Judith.
Prince Vasili in front of the door, near the invalid chair, a wax taper in his left hand, was leaning his left arm on the carved back of a velvet chair he had turned round for the purpose, and was crossing himself with his right hand, turning his eyes upward each time he touched his forehead.
The French doctor held no taper; he was leaning against one of the columns in a respectful attitude implying that he, a foreigner, in spite of all differences of faith, understood the full importance of the rite now being performed and even approved of it.