lantern


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  • noun

Synonyms for lantern

Words related to lantern

light in a transparent protective case

References in classic literature ?
The Persian went on his knees and put his lantern on the ground.
Ashmore looked upward, shading his eyes with his hat held between them and the lantern. The stars were shining; there was not a cloud in the sky; he was denied the explanation which had suggested itself, doubtful as it would have been--a new snowfall with a limit so plainly defined.
Tom got his lantern, lit it in the hogshead, wrapped it closely in the towel, and the two adventurers crept in the gloom toward the tavern.
"No cardinal!" said D'Artagnan, "but only his lantern; where the devil, then, is he?"
Do you hear?" cried the old man, shaking the lantern at me in his agitation, "the keys are gone!"
Without at all noticing the effect produced by this little instrument, Mr Boffin stood it on his knee, and, producing a box of matches, deliberately lighted the candle in the lantern, blew out the kindled match, and cast the end into the fire.
They had stopped to rest for a moment, and the leader was looking about among the bushes with his lantern. "Have you brought the spades?" said one.
I wish you would go and fetch my satchel, two lanterns, and a can of kerosene oil that is under the seat.
Of all the extraordinary children!" she ejaculated a little later, as, with Pollyanna by her side, and the lantern in her hand, she turned back into the attic.
Kneeling on the flagstones by the light of Daddy Jacques's lantern he removed the clothes from the body and laid bare its breast.
I fetched the lantern: it was gold-dust from Bendigo or from Ballarat.
"Wait a few minutes, our lantern will be lit, and, if you like light places, you will be satisfied."
Tambi obeyed, exposing the lantern twenty feet away from where his captain stood.
Hugh, with much low growling and muttering, went back into his lair; and presently reappeared, carrying a lantern and a cudgel, and enveloped from head to foot in an old, frowzy, slouching horse- cloth.
'Now listen, you young limb,' whispered Sikes, drawing a dark lantern from his pocket, and throwing the glare full on Oliver's face; 'I'm a going to put you through there.