languidness


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Synonyms for languidness

a deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity

References in periodicals archive ?
Languidness develops as a central idea in Decadent poetry as a refuge from an increasingly frenzied materialistic age.
What begins with paleness and languidness progresses to something she does not think she can recover from, for she tells her caretaker, Juno, "I know I cannot live long" (32).
Fatigue (also called exhaustion, tiredness, lethargy, languidness, languor, lassitude, and listlessness) is a subjective feeling of tiredness which is distinct from weakness, and has a gradual onset.
With it, we have long passed the stage of laziness, languidness or insincerity.
Thirdly, reform points out the effort to improve the old status, to recover from certain languidness through some concrete measures, to correct the negative aspects within the considered framework, by preserving its genuine form and thus by restoring it.
Canals and rivulets surge ahead with vehemence, with none of the languidness suggested by the word 'backwater'.
The Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness. The Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (Pennebaker, 1982) is a 54-item inventory that taps the frequency of common physical symptoms and sensations.
Patrick Lapeyre, La Lenteur de l'avenir (The Languidness of the Future, 1987) Hello, said the painter, I had forgotten about you.
"Spring causes fatigue, weariness and languidness in individuals living in major cities where the negative ions are in abundance due to air pollution.
Applications to specific literary texts (usually poetry--a constraint that has always been a weakness of cognitive poetics) and genres or modes (e.g., parody, allegory, science fiction) are revealing and creative, but they assume of students a wider reading repertoire than may be practical (ranging from the medieval Dream of the Rood through Emily Bronte to Ted Hughes), and--what may be worse--they suffer at times from almost numbing languidness. The sections on "Discussion," "Explorations," and "Further reading and references" that end each chapter emphasize both the still-tentative status of cognitive poetics and the interactive spirit of this introduction, inviting students to help formulate the field rather than passively receive it.
But it was precisely this disguise--a "majestic sham," says Watkins; the Br'er Rabbit mask of a "crafty con artist"; a "near-hypnotic languidness" and "absentminded coon lethargy" turned all of a sudden into "the silken finesse of his dancing"--that ended up offending his own people, including Bill Cosby in a 1968 CBS special, Black History--Lost, Stolen, or Strayed, in which Perry was reviled as "an embarrassment to blacks," "a mockery of upstanding Negro citizens," "Hollywood's Uncle Tom," and "the willing accomplice to Hollywood's systematic denigration of the black man."
Respondents were asked to complete the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (PILL; Pennebaker, 1982).
Before the first session, and again 4 weeks after the completion of all three sessions, participants completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (PDS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (PILL), a measure of physical symptoms.
Before the first session, and again 4 weeks after the completion of all three sessions, participants completed the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale (PDS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (PILL), a measure of physical symptoms.