kvetch


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to kvetch: Yiddish
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for kvetch

References in periodicals archive ?
Well, she's back again and in league with Bobby Pops (as I like to call young Mr Popper - no standing on ceremony in this TV preview column!) for Friday Night Dinner, his loosely autobiographical sitcom about a dysfunctional Jewish family getting together at the start of the weekend to bicker and kvetch about their lives over the roasties and gravy.
Instead, he chose to go to a small theatre in Ealing to see a darkly comic production by the fearsome Steven Berkoff called Kvetch, whose themes included suicidal tendencies and gay sex fantasies.
Sun-scorched, tech-savvy locals on social networking site Twitter have up to 140 characters to kvetch about Wednesday's record-breaking heat, and tweet away they did.
Michael Wex wrote a book called Born to Kvetch in which he characterizes Yiddish as a language of complaining.
The night before the news conference he had sat through a Bulgarian-language version of his play Kvetch. Such was the emotion and passion of the actors that he said he laughed and recoiled in all the right places, even though he couldn't understand a word.
And something called Women, Know Your Place, where presenters Muriel Gray, Mariella Frostrup and BBC1 boss Jay Hunt kvetch about the lack of opportunities for women in telly.
This essay examines the work of Michael Wex, novelist, performer, and author of the recent non-fiction book on Yiddish, Born to Kvetch. Wex's texts and performance style are analyzed with particular attention to the ways his material addresses themes of exile and outsiderness, and contextualized in a tradition that includes Lenny Bruce and Allan Sherman.
Join the greatest lover in the history of the World Bank as he explores such positions as the Avenging Eagle, the Chicken Hawk, and Kvetch Landing on Subordinate.
What she doesn't do is lecture, kvetch, or admonish.
The magazine piece that made her famous in the 1970s, "A Few Words about Breasts," is a long kvetch about her flat chest, followed by her mother-in-law's sage advice: if you're always on top in bed, he'll never notice.
Michael Wex is the author of Born to Kvetch: Yiddish Language and Culture in All of Its Moods (HarperCollins, 2006).
Sarah Pierce (Kate Winslet) sits together-apart from a gaggle of suburban moms, offspring frolicking on the swings, as they dish, kvetch and complain the morning away.
Another kvetch: Television played repeated loops of video shot from helicopter fly-bys, grim sights of shattered buildings or families stranded on rooftops or frightened people wading through foul waters, without any explanation of where the pictures had been taken.
As we close out 2005--a year Grimaldi has found lots to kvetch about--it strikes me there are an awful lot of adaptations going on just to keep pace with the changes occurring around us.