knavery


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Synonyms for knavery

Synonyms for knavery

References in periodicals archive ?
Balogh, disagreeing with Lindsay, believed that it was knavery more than foolishness that was responsible for the world's troubles.
Protestant literature', Bridgett writes, 'from the time of the Reformation to the present day, is filled with this assumption of the ignorance, folly, and superstition or knavery of Catholics, and the enlightenment and honesty of whatever is sectarian'.
The legendary King Edgar of Britain travels throughout his land, accompanied by a fellow named Honesty who reveals the knavery of the four sons of the corrupt, then deceased Bailiff of Hexham: a farmer, a courtier, a cony-catcher, and a priest.
For instance, in 1566, Thomas Harman, a landowner and local officer from Kent, described a "wild rogue" by comparing him to a beast: "He is more subtle and more given by nature to all kind of knavery than the other [a regular rogue], as beastly begotten in barn or bushes, and from his infancy trade up in treachery; yea, and before ripeness of years doth permit, wallowing in lewd lechery--but that is counted amongst them no sin.
They expose the perfidy of President Putin, the chicanery of President Chirac, the knavery of German intelligence, the alleged greed of George Galloway MP, and the terrorist link-up with the head of al-Qaeda.
The courts should step in to help parties whose good faith attempts to resolve disputes amicably were repaid by knavery.
A 19th-century Orange toast hints at members' cultural outlook: "To the glorious, pious and immortal memory of King William III, who saved us from rogues and roguery, slaves and slavery, knaves and knavery, popes and popery, from brass money and wooden shoes.
The blame is too easily laid on "others"--on politicians, industrialists, businessmen, and bureaucrats--and not on the collaborative, all-but-universal apathy of the so-called silent majority which enables political knavery to succeed and often worthless elements to rise to the top.
But even the noblest ethics suffer attrition, and it is plain that various corporations have become less ethical than others, some to the point of knavery.
Thackeray shows that goodness often goes hand in hand with stupidity and folly and that cleverness is often knavery.
it is not fit That (45-46): Barry, Ram Alley (1608); Brome, The Cunning Lovers (1638); Middleton, The Nice Valour (1616); Randolph, Hey for Honesty, Down with Knavery (1627).
In Harman's transformation of homeless poverty into jestbook knavery Woodbridge reads the anxieties of the mid Tudor age, as a Kentish gentleman living along the main highway to London registers his uneasiness about his changing society in a text that ambivalently mixes jest with earnest, prurience with moralizing, and the comfort of cataloguing with the fear of chaos.
Again, when Franion attempts to aid Egistus's secret flight, he in turn provokes in Egistus the suspicion of a political coup, of some "compacted knavery of the Bohemians to bring the king and him at odds"(Greene 12).
Yet, there reverberates throughout that world a sense of right and wrong, of nobility over knavery, than we expect to find today.