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Your question shows that you do not understand the purpose of the public education system," Wheeler intoned.
Speaking at April's National Association of Broadcasters convention in Las Vegas, Barry Diller, the former poobah who oversaw Universal Studios TV production unit, solemnly intoned that, "The big four networks have in fact reconstituted themselves into the oligopoly that the FCC originally set out to curb, in the 1960s.
Proving his facility with on-camera vocabulary, the official intoned that the ship had indeed "gravitated product.
Hood would peer over his glasses at the audience as he forcefully intoned Abigail's instructions, "Make it the best.
He solemnly intoned in his best former broadcaster's voice that an actual "representative of one of the groups that files these lawsuits against prayers" was right here "in this room.
When confronted by what we believe to be injustice, each and every one of us has probably intoned the old adage, "There should be a law against this.
It's really a parable about lost children, something I think is a widespread cultural phenomenon in the last half of our century," Russell Banks, author of The Sweet Hereafter, intoned piously.
That's all I could think about when President Again Bill Clinton intoned in his second inaugural, "Big things don't come from being small.
Mister Hitchens,' she intoned in reproof, 'how can you sit there with that lovely English accent and say such a thing?
As she intoned the words, ``This is Jimmy Neutron,'' his eyes widened and a smile covered his face.
intoned, "A vote for John Kerry will hasten the Second Coming.
Under George Bush's watch,' he intoned, 'America 's families are falling further be hind.
NAZ, if you could take that mirror," Naseem Hamed's hairdresser intoned gravely during Naz: The Little Prince, The Big Fight.
So well, for instance, did her inimitably timbred voice preserve the memory of its glorious past performances, giving to every word it intoned the density of a concordance entry, that it had scarcely sung three syllables before "Some People" was overwhelmed in thrilling recollections of "no people but show people.
Behold the handmaid of the Lord," my mother intoned.