interlard

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Synonyms for interlard

to put or set into, between, or among another or other things

Synonyms for interlard

introduce one's writing or speech with certain expressions

References in periodicals archive ?
But whatever Fitzgerald and Gould have done to reveal the invisible or tell what has been untold is mitigated by the interlarding of inflated rhetoric, flimsy evidence, and implausible logic.
By his next work of fiction, An American Dream (1965), we have the Norman Mailer we recognize, as if he had risen up from some literary ooze into his most recognizable form, up to his most characteristic literary devices; recklessly pitting God against the Devil, interlarding his social, sexual, and literary lives into one another, and writing every sentence as if it were his last.
Whether his target was Paul Carter (an Australian nullity whose main distinction resided in citing French pseudo-philosophical verbiage as a justification for factual slovenliness), or Michel Foucault (whose allegedly path-breaking insights into the history of prisons and madhouses remained untroubled by the slightest attempt to provide evidence for his grand theoretical speculations), or Simon Schama (now a solemnly vaunted television star, presumably on the basis of his self-confessed taste for interlarding his ostensible reportage with pieces of pure fiction), or Francis Fukuyama (enough said), or pundits more misguided than even these, Mr.
While not easy reading, due to the constant interlarding of Sanskrit quotations illustrating the points being made, Krishan's approach is entirely up to date: the questions he asks and topics he addresses are just those that the reader is likely to want to have dealt with.
Psychologizing and subjective interlarding are all wrong.
Bix wends his way in and out of the interstices of English and American procedural law with ease and clarity in this chapter (as in others), often interlarding his exegesis with interesting insights drawn from philosophical and legal discussions that his wide learning has acquainted him with.