intemperately


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Synonyms for intemperately

indulging excessively

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References in periodicals archive ?
To illustrate the contrast between classical Greek and modern understandings of freedom it might be helpful to think of an alcoholic possessed by a constant, burning desire to drink intemperately. Under what circumstances is this alcoholic free?
It is not clear why Mayor Paul Dyster chose a Saturday evening to intemperately tweet this loaded with invective racism shout out to WGRZ.
First, he watched Scott Walker, currently his main competitor for the Republican front-runner slot, stumble through another not-ready-for-prime-time moment, first hiring a well-liked young consultant named Liz Mair and then sacking her one day later because it turned out that she had tweeted intemperately about the sacred state of Iowa.
There, according to a telegram to the Foreign Office, he was confronted by an official "reading from an intemperately worded text".
There is no evidence that Stapledon ever read Lovecraft, although Leslie Fiedler's monograph on Stapledon connects his views to those of the writer Fiedler intemperately describes as a "neo-Satanist" who, along with the Christian Tolkien, tried to re-introduce the idea of gods into the modern world.
But when President Obama backed away from attacking the Assad regime, there was no question of France unilaterally avenging the deaths of those killed in the chemical weapons strike; Hollande's administration was left looking at once intemperately gung-ho and humbled.
But when President Obama backed away from attacking the Assad regime Hollande's administration was left looking at once intemperately gung-ho and humbled.
DELME Greening, the former Liberal Democrat Councillor for Butetown in Cardiff, rather intemperately accuses me of being thoughtless and out of touch by exploring whether a car-free estate is a viable option in Cardiff (You Say, September 20).
Censors "had the power to take away a horse," says Plutarch, "or expel out of the senate anyone who lived intemperately and out of order." Tolerance of individuality was one thing, but no Roman republican had the right to live "according to ones appetite or fancy without being examined or inquired into." At the same time, one had to defend the republic, right to the maxim that Ceterum autem censeo Carthaginem esse delendam: "Methinks Carthage had ought utterly to be destroyed," And again, it was the responsibility of a good man to educate his children ("Cato formed and fashioned his son to virtue"), honor the gods, treat his servants with firm respect, write treatises on agriculture and law, and marry well, so that the constitution would be left in good hands.
They drank intemperately, in binges, and smoked, but they took good care of their dogs and their trap lines, because that was their livelihood.
To the degree that these habits are absent, and the delectationes of the body intemperately hold sway so that "the intention of the soul is attracted to inferior powers," (71) ab intelligibilia ad sensibilia, reason naturally "suffers defect," (72) is "maximally weakened," (73) and can even become "totally buried" (74) to the point that the soul loses authentic contact with the intelligible form and end of things.
This solution thus brings into focus central Kierkegaardian themes--inwardness, existential movement, freedom--and his strategy of indirect communication, a strategy exhibiting, inter alia, a refusal to tamper with or intemperately impose upon the reader's inward self-activity.
Sanborn's description of Whitman's "florid" cheeks is softened by Willard's sunny description of his "russet apple cheeks," and though Sanborn remembered Whitman behaving intemperately and "rude," Willard describes him as peaceful and in no way "leonine." She also places him, in her autobiography, in fairly illustrious company.
Make a mistake or respond intemperately and the whole world will know in real time.
90), has been ably traced, and that it is the author's lot to supplement it, not, as she vaguely but intemperately insists, to correct and displace, it.