insurgency


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to insurgency: Counter insurgency
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for insurgency

Synonyms for insurgency

organized opposition intended to change or overthrow existing authority

Synonyms for insurgency

an organized rebellion aimed at overthrowing a constituted government through the use of subversion and armed conflict

References in periodicals archive ?
and (2) Can a professional army overcome an insurgency by relying on the people of the country where the insurgency takes place?
The two chapters in Part IV emphasize the ethnic component of the Maoist insurgency.
O'Neill, Insurgency & Terrorism: From Revolution to Apocalypse, Potomac Books, Inc.
12) This observation powerfully puts the military's role in COIN into perspective and shifts the main focus from killing insurgents to attacking the insurgency.
This insurgent syndicate operating within Afghanistan, the destabilizing influence of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and the political situation inside Pakistan, as well as the level of support provided to various aspects of the Afghan insurgency by A1 Qaeda have ensured that Mao's "political temperature" within Afghanistan remains optimal for continued insurgent efforts.
Leaders of an insurgency provide strategic guidance to its members.
In portions of those five (southern) provinces, the insurgency is illegal narcotics, and illegal narcotics is the insurgency," said McNeill, who will hand over command of the NATO-led force in June after 16 months in charge.
The recently-published Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia seeks to address these concerns by providing a full-spectrum approach to terrorism and insurgency in the region.
They advocate a "new" strategy of "precautionary" COIN--very limited military intervention at the earliest stages--as the most cost-effective means of combating insurgency (p.
Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency in Iraq, by Ahmed S.
But the Neo-Salafis' strict interpretation of Sunni Islam and violent rule has alienated traditional-minded Sunnis, including groups which have supported the insurgency against US forces.
The Iraqi insurgency was taking shape, the Syrian border was wide open, munitions and arms dumps with over a million tons of weapons and ammunition were left unguarded and the American forces on the ground, far from beginning to adapt to the changes around them, were already thinking about going home.
Sectarian violence (Sunnis and Shiites killing each other) has surpassed the insurgency (militants attacking foreign and Iraqi troops) as the main security threat.
On the other hand, the above interpretation assumes that the insurgency has been led, or more accurately "hijacked", by al-Qaeda.
A military assessment of Iraq's Sunni Arab insurgency in late 2004 concluded that it had the active support of millions of Sunnis who rejected the legitimacy of a US installed government, according to Lt.